23
October , 2018
Tuesday

 Award recognition luncheon features teachers from across the state   Springfield, IL – The Illinois State Board of ...
  And officials say: ‘Fronts need not apply’   By Chinta Strausberg   While $425 million Red Line South Reconstruction ...
Madigan Joins FTC Initiative in Combating Immigration Services Scams Chicago – Illinois Attorney General Lisa ...
TV One represents with expanded morning news, current affairs and lifestyle line-up, plus increased commitment ...
By Chinta Strausberg   U.S. Rep. Bobby L. Rush (D-1st) appeared at a recent political forum held ...
The Illinois Legislative Black Caucus today will discuss a telling report detailing how the budget ...
The Empowerment Conference will be headlined by host Pastor Zina Pierre ...
Bi-Weekly Workshops Also Focus on How to Market, Protect, and Find a Home for your ...
Requires people ages 18-20 who do not take driver education to complete a 6-hour training ...
Funding Needed for Multicultural Books and Dolls ATLANTA, GA (BlackNews.com) -- In 2013, approximately ...

Archive for October 23rd, 2014

Early Voting is Alive in Illinois: Get With the Program, Get to the Polls Early and Vote

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Early Voting Dates and Locations

SOURCE: Illinois Board of Elections – http://www.elections.il.gov/infoforvoters.aspx


Early voting in Illinois started October 20 and will continue through November 1 at most voting facilities and until November 2 at Five regional sites (see list below) that will be open every day, from Oct. 20 through Nov. 2

Early Voting for the Nov. 4, 2014 General Election will be offered from Mon., Oct. 20 through Sun., Nov. 2.

ALL 51 EARLY VOTING SITES WILL BE OPEN OCT. 20 – NOV. 1:
MONDAY THRU SATURDAY – 9 AM – 5 PM (CLOSED SUNDAYS)

Five regional sites (see list below) will be open every day, from Oct. 20 through Nov. 2 with Sunday hours and evening hours during the final week of Early Voting. Only at these five sites, listed below, hours will be:
OCT. 20-25 – 9 AM – 5 PM
SUN., OCT. 26: 10 AM – 4 PM
OCT. 27-31 – 9 AM – 7 PM
SAT., NOV. 1 – 9 AM – 5 PM
SUN., NOV. 2: 10 AM – 4 PM

Voters registered in the City of Chicago may use any Early Voting site in the city, regardless of where the voters live.

Ballots cast in Early Voting are final. After casting ballots in Early Voting, voters may not return to amend, change or undo a ballot for any reason. It is a felony to vote more than once — or to attempt to vote more than once — in the same election.

Voters don’t need a reason or excuse to use Early Voting.

ID is not required; however, we advise each voter to have ID in the event there is a question about the registration. All Early Voting sites will serve as “grace period registration” sites where voters may register for the first time or update the name or address on their existing registrations. Learn more about Grace Period registration.

EARLY VOTING LOCATIONS & HOURS
1st Ward – Goldblatts Building 1615 W. Chicago
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

2nd Ward – Access Living 115 W. Chicago
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

3rd Ward – Chicago Bee Library 3647 S. State
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

4th Ward – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center 4314 S. Cottage Grove
Oct. 20-25: Mon. thru Sat., 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Oct. 26: 10 am-4 pm
Oct. 27-31: Mon. thru Fri., 9 am-7 pm
Sat., Nov. 1: 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Nov. 2: 10 am-4 pm

5th Ward – Jackson Park 6401 S. Stony Island
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

6th Ward – Whitney Young Library 7901 S. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

7th Ward – Jeffery Manor Library 2401 E. 100th St.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

8th Ward – Olive Harvey College 10001 S. Woodlawn
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

9th Ward – Palmer Park 201 E. 111th St.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

10th Ward – Vodak/East Side Library 3710 E. 106th St.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

11th Ward – District 9 Police 3120 S. Halsted
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

12th Ward – McKinley Park 2210 W. Pershing
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

13th Ward – West Lawn Park 4233 W. 65th St.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

14th Ward – Archer Heights Library 5055 S. Archer
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

15th Ward – Gage Park 2411 W 55th St
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

16th Ward – Lindblom Park 6054 S. Damen
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

17th Ward – Thurgood Marshall Library 7506 S. Racine
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

18th Ward – Wrightwood-Ashburn Library 8530 S. Kedzie
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

19th Ward – Mount Greenwood Park 3721 W. 111th St.
Oct. 20-25: Mon. thru Sat., 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Oct. 26: 10 am-4 pm
Oct. 27-31: Mon. thru Fri., 9 am-7 pm
Sat., Nov. 1: 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Nov. 2: 10 am-4 pm

20th Ward – Coleman Library 731 E. 63rd St.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

21st Ward – Woodson Regional Library 9525 S. Halsted
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

22nd Ward – Piotrowski Park 4247 W. 31st St.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

23rd Ward – Clearing Library 6423 W. 63rd Pl.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

24th Ward – Douglass Library 3353 W. 13th St.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

25th Ward – Chinatown Library 2353 S. Wentworth
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

26th Ward – Humboldt Park Library 1605 N. Troy
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

27th Ward – Eckhart Park 1330 W. Chicago
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

28th Ward – West Side Learning Center 4624 W. Madison
Oct. 20-25: Mon. thru Sat., 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Oct. 26: 10 am-4 pm
Oct. 27-31: Mon. thru Fri., 9 am-7 pm
Sat., Nov. 1: 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Nov. 2: 10 am-4 pm

29th Ward – Amundsen Park 6200 W. Bloomingdale
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

30th Ward – Kilbourn Park 3501 N. Kilbourn
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

31st Ward – Portage Cragin Library 5108 W. Belmont
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

32nd Ward – Bucktown-Wicker Park Library 1701 N. Milwaukee
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

33rd Ward – Horner Park 2741 W. Montrose Ave
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

34th Ward – West Pullman Library 830 W. 119th St.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

35th Ward – Independence Library 3548 W. Irving Park
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

36th Ward – West Belmont Library 3104 N. Narragansett
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

37th Ward – West Chicago Library 4856 W. Chicago
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

38th Ward – Hiawatha Park 8029 W. Forest Preserve
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

39th Ward – N. Park Village Admin Bldg 5801 N. Pulaski

Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

40th Ward – Budlong Woods Library 5630 N. Lincoln
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

41st Ward – Roden Library 6083 N. Northwest Hwy.
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

42nd Ward – Museum of Broadcast Communications 360 N. State
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

43rd Ward – Lincoln Park Library 1150 W. Fullerton
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

44th Ward – Merlo Library 644 W. Belmont
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

45th Ward – District 16 Police 5151 N. Milwaukee
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

46th Ward – Truman College 1145 W. Wilson
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

47th Ward – Welles Park 2333 W. Sunnyside
Oct. 20-25: Mon. thru Sat., 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Oct. 26: 10 am-4 pm
Oct. 27-31: Mon. thru Fri., 9 am-7 pm
Sat., Nov. 1: 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Nov. 2: 10 am-4 pm

48th Ward – Broadway Armory Park 5917 N. Broadway
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

49th Ward – Pottawattomie Park 7340 N. Rogers
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

50th Ward – Warren Park 6601 N. Western
Oct. 20-Nov. 1
Mon-Sat, 9 am-5 pm (closed Sundays)

Board of Elections – 69 W. Washington St., Lower Level Conference Room
Oct. 20-25: Mon. thru Sat., 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Oct. 26: 10 am-4 pm
Oct. 27-31: Mon. thru Fri., 9 am-7 pm
Sat., Nov. 1: 9 am-5 pm
Sun., Nov. 2: 10 am-4 pm

Local African American Leaders Honored in Memory of Whitney M. Young, Jr. and in Support of Local At-Risk Youth

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

CHICAGO, IL -  To commemorate a life of service the 6th annual Whitney M. Young, Jr. Service Awards Dinner, hosted by the, Boy Scouts of America, Chicago Area Council will honor the 100 Black Men of Chicago Inc., John Leonard, President of the Boy Scouts of America, Chicago Area Council, Ava Youngblood, CEO of Youngblood Executive Search Inc., Tom Sampson, CEO Peacock Engineering Inc. and James E. FitzGeraldScouter posthumously.The Co-General Chairs are Kwame Salter President of the Salter Group LLC. and Ron Scott Vice –President Coca-Cola Field Operation Chicago /Wisconsin market Unit Legal Prep Charter Academy.Last year, this benefit funded Scouting programs forover 900 at-risk and low-income youth served by the Chicago Area Council. The event will be on Saturday, October 25th, from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Chicago Regency Ballroom, 151 E. Wacker Dr. For online reservations please visit www.chicagobsa.org/whitneyyoung.

Scoutreach is designed to bring programsthat instill positive values and productive learning opportunities for our youth. Supporting this event makes it possible for underprivileged youth to stay off the street with regular programing and receive camperships and go to Owasippe Scout Reservation, the oldest Boy Scout camp in the nation. Field personnel can be funded through this program to start new Troops in areas where a need exists, but volunteers do not. Through the Boy Scouts, young people have an opportunity to become involved in positive activities, build lasting relationships with mentors and improve self-esteem as they develop into our
future leaders.

Each year the Scoutreach Committee selects local leaders to be honored with a Service Award for the work they do in our community. The Service Award is named after Mr. Whitney M. Young, Jr. for his commitment to serving to improve the lives of AfricanAmericans across the country. Our local honorees have, in their own ways, lived up to the spirit of service by helping to prepare and inspire our children for life.

Branding opportunities and tables are available by contacting Dwayne Hunter at (312) 421-8800, ext. 242
or Dwayne.Hunter@scouting.org.

Whitney M. Young, Jr. was an educator and U.S. civil rights leader who spearheaded the drive for equal opportunity for African-Americans in industry and government during his 10 years as head of the National Urban League.

Boy Scouts of America, Chicago Area Council serves thousands of youthacross the Chicagoland area and surrounding suburbs through traditional Scouting programs, Learning for Life and Exploring. The principle purpose of all Chicago Area Council programs are to instill positive values and prepare youth for life. To learn more, visit www.chicagobsa.org.

For more information contact: Dwayne Hunter, Field Director, Boy Scouts of America, Chicago Area Council

Phone: 312-421-8800 ext. 242

Email: dwayne.hunter@scouting.org

Madigan, Dept. of Revenue: Tax Fraud Operation Nets $100 Million

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS
Ongoing Initiative Recovers $100 Million, 50 Charged Statewide for Unpaid Sales Tax Fraud

CHICAGO, IL – Illinois  Attorney General Lisa Madigan and the Illinois Department of Revenue (IDOR) announced that their joint ongoing criminal enforcement operation to prosecute gas station owners who evaded sales tax payments has recovered over $100 million for the state.

The ongoing operation led by Madigan’s Special Prosecutions Bureau and IDOR’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation was launched to recoup sales tax losses from gas stations throughout Illinois that underreported revenues to avoid paying taxes to the state. Of the 50 gas station owners that have been charged to date, 40 defendants have been already convicted, many of whom were imprisoned. Additionally, tens of thousands of tax dollars have been recouped through IDOR audits.

“The unprecedented results we’ve achieved are a reflection of our commitment to holding tax cheats accountable and to recovering money that should have gone to the state in the first place,” Attorney General Madigan said. “We will continue to pursue businesses that illegally profit at the expense of taxpayers and the state.”

“This effort reflects the outstanding work of a team of investigators, auditors and legal staff,” said Brian Hamer, Director of Revenue. “It shows our commitment to identify tax cheats, require them to pay the taxes they owe and obtain appropriate punishment, including prison time.”

The crackdown on gas station owners has led to a new law in Illinois to penalize these criminals. The law, which was an initiative of Madigan’s office and took effect in January, established stronger penalties and strengthened prosecutors’ ability to pursue Illinois businesses and retailers that evade their sales tax bills. The law created the new crime of Sales Tax Evasion and imposed graduated penalties based on the amount of sales taxes that were evaded.

The collection of unpaid sales taxes is part of Madigan’s ongoing work to collect record revenues for the State of Illinois amidst an unprecedented fiscal crisis. Since Madigan took office, her office has amassed over $10 billion in total collections through a combination of litigation and collection efforts. In 2013 alone, Madigan’s office collected $992,581,592.32 on behalf of the state, equating to $32.18 generated for every state general revenue tax dollar the Attorney General’s office received in 2013. Additionally, in the past year, Madigan has recovered $344 million for the state’s pension systems to cover losses sustained from investments in mortgage-backed securities that contributed to the economic collapse in 2008 as the result of settlements with some of the nation’s largest banks.

New Poll Reveals Overwhelming Majority of Doctors Concerned About Antibiotics Use on Healthy Animals

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Illinois PIRG, Consumers Union and local Northwestern and U of Chicago doctors will release a new Consumer Reports poll that points to overwhelming concern from doctors around the common meat industry practice of feeding antibiotics to healthy animals.

A press conference will be held Thursday, October 23, 2014 at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, First Floor, 225 E. Chicago Ave, Chicago, at 10:00 A.M. with:

1.     Sameer Patel, MD MPH

Lurie Children’s Hospital Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Director

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Assistant Professor

2.     Susan Boyle-Vavra, PhD

University of Chicago MRSA Research Center, Director

Associate Professor, University of Chicago

3.     Michael Hansen, PhD

Senior Staff Scientist, Consumers Union

4.     Dev Gowda, JD

Campaign Director, Illinois PIRG’s End the Misuse of Antibiotics Campaign

Visuals: Local doctors in white coats; petition signatures of 7,000 health professionals to Obama administration

Illinois Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) is a statewide consumer group that stands up to powerful interests whenever they threaten our health and safety, our financial security or our right to fully participate in our democratic society.

Two Months, No Special Prosecutor: Demand Gov. Nixon and Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster Appoint a Special Prosecutor to Investigate Michael Brown’s Shooting

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Demand the appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate Michael Brown’s shooting

From: Cornell William Brooks
President and CEO
NAACP

On Tuesday, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon announced the formation of the Ferguson Commission. Its goal is to make the community a “stronger, fairer place for everyone to live.”

We’re thrilled Governor Nixon—in the second year of his second term—has finally recognized the need to address the social and economic hardships plaguing so many of his constituents.

But, Michael Brown’s killer remains free. The investigation into Michael’s death is still being led by a prosecutor with deep ties to local police.

A panel won’t change those facts. Only one thing will.

Take action now: Tweet Governor Nixon and Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster. Demand the appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate Michael Brown’s shooting.

Tweet them now.

If justice for Michael is to be achieved, a special prosecutor must be appointed in this case.

The nation is still angry, and we have every right to be. We have every right to demand fairness under the law and deep institutional changes that can save lives and build trust between our communities and law enforcement. If this commission is to be effective then it must first advocate for justice for Michael Brown, for ending racial profiling, and for desperately needed reviews of police practices.

I traveled to St. Louis to join our brothers and sisters participating in a weekend of peaceful protests that will ensure the issues of racial profiling and police brutality aren’t simply swept under the rug. We must keep the pressure on decision makers to do the right thing.

Without an unbiased, transparent investigation into Michael Brown’s shooting, justice cannot be served.

Send your tweet to Governor Nixon and state Attorney General Koster now:

http://action.naacp.org/We-Need-Justice

In solidarity,

Cornell William Brooks
President and CEO
NAACP

Youth Depression a ‘Tough Pill’ for Indian American Parents to Swallow

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Youth Depression a ‘Tough Pill’ for Indian American Parents to Swallow

New America Media

First Person, Viji Sundaram

Editor’s Note: As in other immigrant communities, open discussion of mental health issues is taboo for many Indian American families, despite the fact that incidences of depression and similar disorders are on the rise. For one young woman, that stigma led to years of hidden suffering and missed opportunities at treatment, all in the name of maintaining her family’s “model minority” image. Leela (not her real name) spoke to NAM Health Editor Viji Sundaram about her experience.

It started in middle school, when I was around 11 years old. I started feeling weak, had memory lapses and had no motivation to do anything. I felt sad most of the time. I thought the sadness was a normal part of pre-teen angst. I often starved myself for attention from my parents and friends. Most days, I cried myself to sleep.

Often, I didn’t finish my homework or turn it in. How could I? My thought processes were so chaotic. My grades slipped, and I felt guilty about it. I knew I was letting down my parents. My dad had done well in Silicon Valley. How I wish they understood what was going on inside of me. Whenever they asked me why I looked so exhausted, I just told them I was fine. And they didn’t press me further.

I tried to pull myself together, to work through my issues. I hid my pain, plunging myself into Indian classical music and South Indian classical dancing. Many people told me I was a good singer, but I didn’t recognize it as a skill I possessed and I had no confidence to sing before a gathering.

At school, my teachers didn’t understand me, either, but that may have been because I couldn’t articulate what I was going through. But even so my counselor sensed something was not well with me. My classmates began kind of bullying me, telling me I was dumb. It made me feel awful because I had always been a high achiever. My self-esteem hit rock bottom. My social life all but disappeared.

When I was in middle school, the principal told my parents to have me checked. They took me to an occupational therapist/educational strategist, who diagnosed me with Attention Deficit Disorder. While she treated my depression as a mere footnote, I was relieved to know that whatever it was that had been troubling me had a name.

But it was a tough pill for my parents to swallow. We South Asians are a model minority community and children are not supposed to have mental health issues. Sympathetic as my mom was toward me, she told me I wasn’t to tell my relatives or people in the community about my problem.

I was trapped inside a ball of depression and heartache. I felt so alone. Nevertheless, I was determined not to let that come in the way of my academics. At my parents’ insistence, I enrolled in some advanced placement courses like math, even though I wasn’t good at it.

Then my grades began to slip again. In my second year of high school, I grew anorexic. I dropped from 110 pounds to 84 pounds. For months, I kept slipping between binging and starving. I frequently flirted with the thought of committing suicide.

When I got accepted to the UC system, my parents were thrilled. With continued medication and therapy, I did well in school, although I didn’t have many friends. This was the first time I was living away from home and away from the networks I had built growing up.

One day, while in my freshman year, someone whom I knew sexually assaulted me. I was traumatized and I went into deep depression. I shut down completely and barricaded myself in my room. I stopped going to class. When my parents found out, they were angry.

I continued having panic attacks into the next year because the guy who raped me was still around. I kept retracting into myself and binging. I put on almost 50 pounds. My attendance was so poor that at the end of my sophomore year, I got kicked out of school and went back home.

I confided in my mom and told her about the rape. She was sympathetic. I enrolled in a nearby community college and isolated myself from my community because I didn’t want to be judged. I developed social anxiety.

More recently, I have been opening up to my mom and my dad, especially to my mom. They are doing their best to help me cope with what I am going through. But my mom still can’t read me because I still hide things from her.

Until recently, I didn’t know depression was treatable. I wish my teachers had recognized what was happening to me, and had not treated it as a passing phase.

I also wish Indian American parents realize how prevalent mental depression is and recognize it in their children so we won’t have to suffer in silence. I know other kids in my community who have mental health issues. Recognition is the first step in the healing process.

Accepting as my parents have been of late of what I’m going through, they have still not told anyone outside the family. That’s why as I share my story, I have to hide under the pseudonym, Leela.

This story was produced as part of New America Media’s #FeelBetter project, a storytelling campaign about depression in young people of diverse backgrounds. To explore the story collection, visit the #FeelBetter page and follow the campaign on Facebook.

ISBE to Recognize Exemplary Educators October 25 at `Those Who Excel’ Banquet

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Outstanding Early Career Educator Named


NORMAL, IL – More than 230 educators and school staff members will be recognized later this week at the 40th annual Those Who Excel banquet in Bloomington-Normal. The Illinois State Board of Education annually honors bus drivers, custodians, support staff, counselors, volunteers, board members, teachers and administrators from among the 857 school districts in the Prairie State.

“It is really exciting to recognize individuals from so many fields who are impacting student success in a variety of ways,” said State Board of Education Chairman Gery J. Chico. “Through Those Who Excel, we are able to celebrate those dedicated people who put students first each day, whether they are clearing the sidewalks for a safe entry into school on a snowy morning or staying late to tutor students. Each of these nominees is committed to helping students achieve and we are very pleased to have this opportunity to honor their contribution to Illinois’ students and public education.”

For the eighth consecutive year, the evening ceremonies will include celebrating one individual chosen as the Outstanding Early Career Educator. This year that honor will go to Cassandra “Cassie” Fenton who will be among those recognized Saturday, Oct. 25 at the Marriott Hotel and Conference Center in Normal. To be considered for the Early Career Educator award, a nominee must be within their first five years of teaching and their nomination paperwork must include a recommendation from an administrator, a teacher, a student and a parent or community member. A committee of peers, organized through the Illinois State Board of Education, chooses the award winner.

Cassie drew on her own experiences as a student at Crystal Lake Central High School when it was time to consider possible careers. Her success working with her teenage classmates and her interest in math led to her current post as a high school math teacher, something she describes as a “calling.”

A teacher at Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire for the past five years, Cassie teaches a diverse range of students, including those with an Individualized Education Program (IEP), though she rejects labels.

“Cassie is an extraordinary teacher who brings hope to students who have long been resolved as ‘math unable,’ ” explains Dashan Jain, director of mathematics at Adlai E. Stevenson High School. “As an early career educator, she has challenged the labels placed on students with needs and placed the responsibility of bridging the gap on herself. She is developing as a leader of differentiated instruction.”

Staff and students also say that Cassie creates a safe and welcoming environment in the classroom.  In her letter of recommendation, one of her students wrote that on the first day of school, “Mrs. Fenton asks her class to write down what we need from her because she wants us to feel safe every day. Because of Mrs. Fenton’s efforts, I didn’t fear having the wrong answer because I knew the class wouldn’t criticize me.”

“Learning about teachers who demonstrate a strong connection to students in their first few years of their career is exciting,” said State Superintendent of Education Christopher A. Koch. “I am happy to have the chance to bring attention to educators who are making a difference early in their careers because they represent the future of what I and many others still believe is one of the most important professions. Cassie is clearly a teacher who is making a difference in our classrooms.”

Cassie graduated from Loyola University in Chicago with a Bachelor of Science in mathematics and a Bachelor of Arts in secondary education. Her determination to help all students be successful inspired her to earn her Master of Arts in differentiated instruction from Concordia University Chicago.

ISBE recently launched a new Those Who Excel webpage at http://www.isbe.net/those-who-excel/default.htm. The site includes the latest news about the award program, lists of Those Who Excel honorees from recent years, bios of the current Illinois Teacher of the Year and Early Career Educator of the Year, and a list of Illinois Teachers of the Year from 1970 to the present.

This year’s Teacher of the Year will also be named upon the close of the Those Who Excel ceremonies Saturday night. The finalists were announced earlier this month. The event is sold out.

A complete list of recipients by county can be accessed at http://www.isbe.net/those-who-excel/2015/Those-Who-Excel-2014-15.pdf.

Jesse White Announces Discovery of the 1840 Menard County Census

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Abraham Lincoln acquaintances listed in census


Illinois Secretary of State and State Archivist Jesse White announced that his office has found the original 1840 state census for Menard County. Menard County Treasurer Jacqueline S. Horn along with other county officials and county board members assisted in the discovery of the census.

“Working with Menard County officials, my office at the Illinois State Archives discovered the 27 page hand-written census in a county vault, located across the street from the Menard County Courthouse in Petersburg,” White said. “Abraham Lincoln lived in New Salem, just south of Petersburg in present day Menard County, from 1831 to 1837. We are proud to say that a few of President Lincoln’s associates are listed on this newly discovered census.”

Among Lincoln’s acquaintances listed in the census are Mentor Graham, who served as a teacher to Lincoln; Bowling Green, who helped teach Lincoln law; and James Rutledge, who encouraged Lincoln to run for the state legislature in 1832. Menard County was established by legislation sponsored by state representative Abraham Lincoln on February 15, 1839. It previously had been part of Sangamon County.

With the 1840 census, genealogists and family historians can access information on early Menard County, including the names of the heads of households and the number of people living in each household. According to the census, the county had 11 mills and three distilleries. The census shows the population of Menard County as 4,481; 2,381 males and 2,086 females. Of the males, 648 were reported as liable for militia service. There were fourteen African Americans listed as living in the county. This included seven African Americans listed as indentured servants, which in 1840 Illinois could be seen as coded language for slaves.

Illinois conducted state censuses by county every five years, from 1820 to 1845 and then conducted censuses in 1855 and 1865. The 1840 census would have been the first state census to include the newly created Menard County. Federal censuses were and still are conducted every ten years at the start of every decade.

Each county appointed a commissioner who was responsible for taking the census and transferring one copy to the Secretary of State and another to the clerk of the county’s circuit court. However, very few copies of the early state censuses exist. Until the discovery of the Menard County 1840 state census, the Archives held similar enumerations for only 37 counties of the 87 that existed at that time.

Other historic documents in the vault include an early land tract book (1827 – 1848), delinquent tax lists (1850 – 1870), a tax assessment abstract (1850 – 1857) and a county order book (1848 – 1873).

The 1840 census has been cleaned and flattened by State Archives staff. It will be microfilmed and scanned to make it available to researchers and genealogists at both the Menard County Clerk’s office and the Illinois Regional Archives Depository located at the University of Illinois at Springfield.

New Book Explores the Story of Jocko Graves – An Unsung and Forgotten African American Child Hero

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Waymon E. LeFall’s new book, “Jocko: A Long Way from Home Down Under”, is an intriguing journey through myth and truth

Jocko by Waymon E. Lefall

Nationwide (BlackNews.com) — New book, Jocko: A Long Way from Home Down Under from Page Publishing author Waymon E. LeFall is a thoroughly researched work of investigative literature. Attempting to reconstruct the past, LeFall endeavors to uncover the truth behind the commonly seen statues of a young boy holding a lantern found in many yards across the U.S.

LeFall, a renaissance man and accomplished scholar, has complete his first book, Jocko A Long Way from Home Down Under – a vibrant recounting of one man’s quest for knowledge in a society that holds many secrets.

During the American Revolutionary War there were many heroes, and yet many more unsung and forgotten. One such story is that of Jocko Graves who was a son of a free black man and while Jocko was too young to join the American Revolutionary Army, he did so anyway. However, most of Jocko’s history and legacy remain shrouded in mystery as one of the only records left of him are that of little black statues of a black boy holding a lantern found on many white folk’s lawns.

Jock: A Long Way from Home Down Under explores the shrouded past of Jocko Graves, while trying to shift through what is fact and what has become myth. The book follows the trail of evidence followed by Waymon LeFall as he goes on a quest to find out if Jocko Graves is actually the first African-American child hero, or if the legends are just merely that – legends.

Published by New York City-based Page Publishing, Waymon LeFall’s exploration of the past is the grand sojourn into an uncharted wilderness of history.

Readers who wish to experience this adventurous work can purchase Jocko: A Long Way from Home Down Under at bookstores everywhere, or online at the Apple iTunes store, Amazon, Google Play or BarnesandNoble.com.

For additional information, review copies or media inquiries, contact Page Publishing at (866) 315-2708.

Photo Caption: Bookcover and author, Waymon E. LeFall


Beth Reese and Dr. Wayne Watson to Chair Chicago Sinfonietta’s 2015 Ball

Posted by Admin On October - 23 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS
Prominent Co-Chairs Come Together to Raise Critical Funds
for the Nation’s Most Diverse Orchestra


CHICAGO, IL – Chicago Sinfonietta, the nation’s most diverse orchestra that has become nationally recognized for its innovative programming, has announced it’s 2015 Ball Chairs: Beth Reese, CEO of Nicor Gas, and Dr. Wayne D. Watson, Chicago State University President. Reese and Watson will chair the single-most important fundraiser of the Sinfonietta’s season. The Ball, which takes place on May 30, 2015 at The Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park, raises over $450,000 for the orchestra’s innovative programming and educational outreach programs.

“I encourage and celebrate inclusion, diversity and equality, and it is an honor to co-chair such an important fundraising effort,” said Beth Reese, President, Nicor Gas. Named one of 2014 “Who’s Who” by Crain’s Chicago Business, Reese is the first woman president of Nicor Gas – the largest natural gas distributor in Illinois. Nicor Gas is based in Naperville, the Chicago Sinfonietta’s west suburban home. Reese is responsible for ensuring that natural gas – an American, abundant, affordable and clean energy source – safely and reliably reaches more than 2.2 million homes and businesses in 656 northern Illinois communities. Reese has served as Vice President of business innovation, customer service and finance, and as controller. Reese is a member of the board of the United Way of Metropolitan Chicago and The Field Museum of Natural History. Nicor Gas is the lead sponsor of the 2015 Ball.

Dr. Watson currently is the President of Chicago State University and a triple-degree holder from Northwestern University. Dr. Watson has a vitae that reflects a history of building and enhancing educational institutions and programs. He is Chancellor Emeritus of the City Colleges of Chicago, the former Chair of the Board of Advisors for the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University, and the current chair of the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO). Dr. Watson’s vision for the “Renaissance” of Chicago State University includes a plethora of goals which represents a sustained strategy that strives for excellence in education. One of his challenges is to establish opportunities for students who have academic promise but also have financial challenges. Dr. Watson’s goal is to further the university’s commitment to globalization, diversity, and the revival of the arts. These goals mirror the Chicago Sinfonietta’s mission of diversity and institutional inclusiveness. Watson states:

“I consider it a great honor to be named as a Chair of Chicago Sinfonietta’s 2015 Ball and I look forward to playing a role in helping the Sinfonietta continue their important work. As a life-long educator, I greatly appreciate the role the arts play in providing young people with a well-rounded educational experience and I especially appreciate the effort that the Chicago Sinfonietta continues to make in ensuring that students from economically disadvantaged areas continue to have access to vital arts and educational resources.”

Each year, the Ball not only highlights the Chicago Sinfonietta’s past season performances, but also provides a sneak peek into its upcoming performances. The 2014-2015 season got off to a “rambunctious” start, featuring a unique collaboration with punk marching band Mucca Pazza. Audiences were enraptured throughout the concert just as much as during its grand finale of Tchaikovsky’s Overture of 1812.  In November, the Sinfonietta will team up with Redmoon Theater to celebrate Día de los Muertos, a colorful Latin tradition of life and loss. January marks the Sinfonietta’s Annual Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This year’s concert will feature a coterie of remarkable young talents including cello prodigy Sujari Britt, Young Chicago Authors, the Waubonsie Valley High School Mosaic Choir, as well as Jherrrard Marseille Hardeman, a 15 year-old African American composer and conductor who made his Sinfonietta debut at the 2014 Ball. “Primal Instincts,” the Sinfonietta’s fourth concert, will feature Cristina Pato, a Galician bagpiper, as well as a powerful rendition of Orff’s Carmina Burana. The season will end in tribute to our service men and women by featuring the works of Ives, Williams, and Dvořák. Audience members will be asked to submit photos of close relatives who have served, capping the season in homage.

Although innovative programming is at the heart of the Sinfonietta’s vision, the orchestra’s outreach programs remain a priority to its mission. The Sinfonietta’s education programs serve diverse students at various points of development, starting with Audience Matters, the Sinfonietta’s core in-school education program. Economic need and the absence of a pre-existing music program are qualifying factors for AM’s implementation.  Students are introduced to the orchestra as well as given the opportunity to explore djembes, Orff instruments, and African dance. Over 1,000 fourth-seventh graders participate in AM each year. SEED (Student Ensembles with Excellence and Diversity) identifies talented high school musicians and provides them with training from Sinfonietta musicians. The Project Inclusion Ensemble Fellowship, created by Sinfonietta founder Maestro Freeman, provides fellows opportunities to perform orchestral and chamber music as well as study from and perform alongside Sinfonietta musicians. The Project Inclusion Conducting Fellowship, the CS’s newest educational program, cultivates young, promising conductors though the mentorship of Maestro Mei-Ann Chen, music industry leaders, and the Sinfonietta’s administrative staff.

The Ball attracts the crème de la crème of the Chicago society. Over 550 guests representing corporate and private sectors will gather at The Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park on this celebratory night. Ball attendees will enjoy a cocktail reception before being seated in the Fairmont’s beautifully decorated ballroom. Once at their tables, guests will enjoy a customized gourmet four-course meal. Maestro Chen will then lead the Sinfonietta to the stage in hopes of capturing not just much-needed support, but the hearts of those in attendance.

Ball reservations start at $400/person with table sponsorships starting at $5,000. For more information on ball sponsorships and table reservations, please visit www.chicagosinfonietta.org/2015ball or contact Courtney Perkins, Director of Development and Operations, at 312-284-1559. Follow Chicago Sinfonietta on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and #redefineclassical.

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Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

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