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November , 2018
Friday

SPRINGFIELD, IL – Democratic Party of Illinois Chairman Michael J. Madigan announced that the party would ...
  By Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu    Chicago, IL - Why is it so difficult to teach Black boys ...
Student Organizing Results in Columbia University Becoming First to Divest from Private Prison Industry On Monday ...
Sign the petition to Congress: “Thanks to the Supreme Court, the Voting Rights Act is weaker ...
  Author Daniel Bruno is ignored by Corporate Media focused on Opinion Polls   Nationwide (BlackNews.com) -- ...
Springfield, IL - People of all ages are invited to help set a new ...
SPRINGFIELD, IL — Illinois State Senators Jacqueline Y. Collins (D-Chicago 16th) and Emil ...
On the evening of Tuesday, June 5, a coalition of activists will protest Israeli Ambassador to ...
F. Todd Ryan Developing His Land into $4,000,000 Development Boston, MA ...
ISVI superintendent tapped for the position CHICAGO, IL – The Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) ...

Archive for May 6th, 2011

Race in America: Scholars examine race, inequality and culture in a 21st-century landscape

Posted by Admin On May - 6 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

Evanston, IL -  Four Northwestern University scholars authored or co-authored three essays in “Race, Inequality, and Culture.” In the new issue of Daedalus, the Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 22 prominent social scientists examine race in America today, weighing in on topics ranging from the future of African American studies to intra-minority group relations in the 21st century.

Has the mission of African American studies changed? How is the old racial order being transformed? How will racial minorities react to the predicted demographic shifts of living in a majority-minority country?

In ”Controversial Blackness: The Historical Development and Future Trajectory of African American Studies” by Martha Biondi, associate professor of African American studies and history at Northwestern University, the author examines where the field is headed. “Arguably the most exciting development for African American studies in the twenty-first century is the expansion of doctoral programs. The opportunity to train young scholars can only add to the growth, rigor and institutional stature of the field.”

In “Destabilizing the American Racial Order” by Jennifer L. Hochschild of Harvard University, Vela M. Weaver of the University of Virginia and Traci Burch, assistant professor of political science at Northwestern University, the authors seek to sort out, post election of President Barack Obama, “what is changing in the American racial order, what persists or is becoming even more entrenched, and what is likely to affect the balance between change and continuity.”

In “Intra-minority Intergroup Relations in the Twenty-First Century” by Jennifer A. Richeson, the Weinberg College Board of Visitors Research and Teaching Professor in the department of psychology and faculty fellow, Institute for Policy Research, and her co-author Maureen A. Craig, a third-year doctoral student in the social psychology program at Northwestern University, the authors examine how members of different racial minority groups may evaluate one another in a majority-minority nation. “A separate line of research and theory in social psychology suggests that, rather than adopting a common ingroup identity, members of distinct racial minority groups may react to the predicted demographic changes quite differently: namely as a social identity threat.”

“With the presidency of Barack Obama and the subsequent national conversation about a new, post-racial America, it is the right time to examine both real and perceived changes in the racial divide since the 1960s,” said Leslie Berlowitz, president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

To order a copy of these volumes or to subscribe to Daedalus visit: http://www.amacad.org/publications/daedalus.aspx.

Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (www.amacad.org) is an independent policy research center that conducts multidisciplinary studies of complex and emerging problems. Current academy research focuses on science and technology policy; global security; social policy; the humanities and culture; and education.

NORTHWESTERN NEWS: www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/

Better Business Bureau tips to ensure mom gets her flowers for Mother’s Day as complaints rise 60%

Posted by Admin On May - 6 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

(A Message from the Better Business Bureau)

CHICAGO, IL- Ordering Mother’s Day flower arrangements leads to one of the busiest holidays for florists.  It also is an occasion when consumers expect orders to be delivered exactly as promised. The Better Business Bureau (BBB) offers tips to those sending gifts this Mother’s Day to help keep both mothers and wallets happy.

“Whether ordering flowers in person, online or over the phone, consumers should make sure they understand what they are buying, and give the florist complete information to ensure proper delivery,” said Steve J. Bernas, president & CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois.

Complaints in northern Illinois have increased to 533 from 321 or a 60-percent increase in the last 12 months. Inquiries are also up to 6,313 from 2,463 or a 155-percent increase; as more people are shifting to the internet for floral orders they are also doing their due diligence and researching online florists with the BBB first.

Pay careful attention to the options offered such as size of arrangement, color of flowers, color of vase, delivery in a box or vase, and inclusion of an enclosure or gift card.

“Another important point is to make sure that your order is clear and detailed. Review the guarantee on the site or with the salesperson. This will help alleviate your concerns about quality or delivery,” states Bernas. “While you think you’re ordering from a local florist, you may actually be on the phone with someone hundreds or thousands of miles away.”

The BBB offers the following tips to having a successful flower delivery this Mother’s Day:

  • Do your homework. Before ordering flowers, chocolates or any other gifts for Mother’s Day check out the company’s Business Review at www.bbb.org in order to help prevent disappointment with the product or customer service.
  • Allow time for shipping. Check with the retailer or check the Web site to make sure that you have allowed enough time for delivery by your specified date. Make sure that this date is specified clearly and guaranteed when you order. If you order ahead of time, delivery and other charges may be less than a last minute order.
  • Have a back-up plan. Make sure you understand the store’s guarantee. Find out how customer complaints are handled and what recourse you will have if the arrangement is not satisfactory.
  • Make sure the florist has your information. There are times when delivery instructions need to be confirmed or a delivery driver needsadditional directions. Making sure the florist has a call-back phone number or your cell phone to help them make sure your mom gets what you expect.

For more information on shopping with companies you can trust, visit www.bbb.org

City College students and community leaders to challenge new district policies

Posted by Admin On May - 6 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

Will hold Press Conference/Protest Friday, May 6, 10:00 a.m., at City Hall, 5th Floor Mayor’s Office


Students, faculty, and community leaders will hold a press conference May 6 at Chicago City Hall to raise the alarm about policy decisions by the City Colleges administration “designed to swell the ranks of pinstripe patronage workers including politically-connected contractors at the expense of frontline services for students.”

Students and their supporters are organizing to attend the next Board of Trustees’ meeting on Thursday May 12th to raise these concerns directly with new Board members appointed by Rahm Emanuel.

Additionally, students have already filed suit with the Circuit Court and plan to escalate their organizing efforts to stop the administration from “selling out their schools.”  They say NO to privatization and the corporate manipulation of the education systems in Chicago to suit the anti-education needs of big business.  They are also demanding an “end to the old Daley regime’s tactic of marginalizing the voices of students, staff, community members and other stakeholders in matters directly affecting them.”

Speakers to participate at the press conference are:

Theodore Fabriek, student at Kennedy-King College and District SGA President

Viviana Arrieta, student at Wright College and Students for a Democratic Society President

Jokarhi Miller, student at Malcolm X College and District SGA Council Parliamentarian

Jamila Onyeali, South Side community leader

Nubian Malik, South Side community leader

Reverend Paul Jakes, New Tabernacle of Faith Baptist Church

Reverend Michael Stenson, General Assembly Church in Englewood

Only 12 Days in Springfield: Another broken promise by Quinn

Posted by Admin On May - 6 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

Governor needs to be in State Capitol more


Illinois Republican Party Chairman Pat Brady called on Governor Pat Quinn to spend more time in Springfield, in light of recent news reports showing he had only been in our state’s capital city 12 days while spending 70 days in Chicago since his inauguration in January.

“Governor Quinn is following in the footsteps of Rod Blagojevich,” said Brady. “When he became Governor, he promised us that, unlike Blagojevich, he’d live in the Executive Mansion in Springfield. Twelve days just doesn’t cut it.”

Brady said that he understands that the Governor should travel around the state to meet with residents but that ultimately decisions are made in the capitol with legislators from across the state.

“There’s more to Illinois than just Chicago,” Brady said. “This is one of the reasons that the Governor is out of touch with the common-sense concerns of Illinois residents and business owners.”


Journalists’ appeal to Iran on World Press Freedom Day to release Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal

Posted by Admin On May - 6 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

(From New America Media)

On the occasion of World Press Freedom Day we call on the government and judicial authorities of the Islamic Republic of Iran to release our colleague Shane Bauer and his friend Josh Fattal, an environmental educator, after more than 21 months of detention.

Shane, 28, is a talented freelance reporter and photographer whose work for a variety of news organizations has helped Americans better understand the impact of U.S. policy in the Middle East. While based in Damascus, Syria, for a year before his arrest, Shane, a fluent Arabic speaker, reported sensitively and incisively from Iraq, Syria and Yemen. Previously, he’d reported from Darfur and Ethiopia. At the time of his arrest, he was preparing a report about the Israeli military’s suspected misuse of nonlethal weapons in the West Bank.

We have no doubt that the charges of espionage Iranian prosecutors have leveled against Shane and Josh are entirely unfounded. Shane and Josh were on vacation with Shane’s fiancee Sarah Shourd when the three were arrested during a hiking trip in Iraqi Kurdistan near the border with Iran. Sarah was compassionately released last fall, but Shane and Josh are still being wrongfully denied their freedom.

Shane is not being held prisoner because of his work as a journalist. But Shane was traveling in Iraq because he had previously done extensive and revelatory reporting there, exposing, for example, large-scale U.S. bribery of influential sheikhs in Iraq and human rights abuses by Iraq’s U.S.-trained Special Operations Forces.

As editors and reporters who have worked closely with Shane and admire his work, we firmly believe that his detention is unjust. We call on Iran to release Shane and Josh immediately.

Sincerely,

Monika Bauerlein and Clara Jeffery, co-editors, Mother Jones, San Francisco, CA
Sandy Close, executive editor and director, New America Media, San Francisco, CA
Jack Epstein, foreign editor, San Francisco Chronicle
Esther Kaplan, editor, The Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute, New York, NY
Vlae Kershner, news director, SFGate, the website of San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco, CA
Richard Kim, executive editor, The Nation, New York, NY
Tim Redmond, executive editor, San Francisco Bay Guardian, San Francisco, CA
Robert Rosenthal, executive director, Center for Investigative Reporting, Berkeley, CA
Joel Simon, executive director, Committee to Protect Journalists, New York, NY
A.C. Thompson, staff reporter, ProPublica, New York, NY

A note from Sandy Close:

Dear NAM colleagues,

Shane Bauer — a gifted photojournalist fluent in Arabic who reported for NAM for almost a year  from the Middle East — remains in prison in Iran, along with his friend Josh Fattai.

Not a day has gone by since their arrest by Iranian security forces –allegedly for crossing the border between Iraqi Kurdistan and Iran —  that I haven’t pondered his fate.

As US news organizations have cut back on our overseas bureaus and networks, it is courageous freelancers like Shane who provide us with vital coverage.  Please consider posting the appeal (below) to the government of Iran for the release of Shane and Josh.

We are especially grateful to the Committee to Protect Journalists for their vigilant efforts to secure greater protections for freelancers around the world.

Man sentenced to Natural Life for the murders of five family members

Posted by Admin On May - 6 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

A man who pled guilty to murdering five of his family members, while they slept, in a brutal attack at a home on Chicago’s South Side last year was sentenced to natural live in prison, according to the Office of Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez.

James Larry, 33, of Wisconsin, was charged in April 2010 in a multiple count indictment, with First Degree Murder, Attempted First Degree Murder, and Intentional Homicide of an Unborn Child for a shooting spree inside his sister’s home in the 7200 block of South Mozart in Chicago.

Larry pled guilty last month to the murder charges for shooting and killing his mother, Leona Larry, 57; his son, Jihad Larry, 7-months-old; his wife Tawanda Thompson, 19, who was pregnant at the time of the murder; and his nieces, Kelesha Larry, 3, and Keyshai Fields, 16, who was also pregnant at the time of the murder.

Lary also pleaded guilty to Attempted First Degree murder charges for shooting and critically wounding his nephew, Demond Larry, 13, and for shooting at his niece, 12, as she fled from the home and also shooting at a 35-year-old man, who also lived in the home.

Cook County Judge James Linn sentenced Larry to 5 natural life sentences for the murder charges, two 30-year prison sentences for the attempted murder charges and two 45-year prison sentences for the intentional homicide of an unborn child charges to be served concurrently during a court hearing.

According to prosecutors, in the early afternoon of April 13, 2010, the defendant drove from Madison, Wisconsin to the residence on Mozart with victims Tawanda Thompson, Jihad Larry, Leona Larry and Demond Larry. The defendant and the victims were spending the night at the residence.

In the early morning hours of April 14, 2010, the defendant shot the victims while they slept. Larry shot his mother as she slept on a sofa in the living room. The defendant then entered he three first floor bedrooms and shot the rest of the victims. Jihad Larry, Kelesha Larry, Keyshai Fields and Towanda Thompson all died as a result of gunshot wounds inflicted by the defendant. Tawanda and Keyshai were both pregnant and the unborn children did not survive. The victim’s mother Leona Larry was taken to the hospital where she died on May 1, 2010 from gunshot wounds.

According to prosecutors, Larry then fired his gun at Torino Hill who lived in the basement of the home. The defendant kicked in the door of Hill’s bedroom, pointed the gun at him and pulled the trigger several times but no bullets fired.

The 12-year-old victim was awakened by noise and got out of bed. She saw several family members covered in blood and saw Larry on the first floor of the home with a gun. The victim ran from the home and when she looked back, she saw the defendant chasing her down the street. Larry pointed a gun at the victim and fired one bullet at her which missed. The victim escaped and contacted the police.

Larry fled on foot and was apprehended a short time later by the Chicago Police Department. The defendant led police to the murder weapon and gave a videotaped statement admitting to the murders.

State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez thanked Assistant State’s Attorneys Joseph Magats, Deputy Chief of the Criminal Prosecutions Bureau, and James McKay, Chief of Capital Litigation, for their work on the case.

Attorney General Madigan announces $90.8 million settlement with UBS

Posted by Admin On May - 6 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS


Illinois Municipalities, Agencies and Nonprofits Awarded $3 Million Over Bank’s come out before or after Mrs. Cora?  What times the party at?  Lots of peeps cant get out until 5-6ish so we will be out later…Scheme


Chicago, IL — Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan announced a $90.8 million, multistate settlement with Union Bank of Switzerland (“UBS”) for its involvement in a scheme to rig bids and engage in other anticompetitive practices that defrauded state agencies, municipalities, school districts and nonprofits in purchasing municipal bond derivatives from the bank.

Madigan said the settlement, which was joined by 23 other states and the District of Columbia, will result in nearly $3 million in restitution to Illinois municipalities, local government agencies and nonprofits harmed by the bank’s efforts to orchestrate illegal bids for municipal derivatives.

“UBS sought to profit at any cost, even if it meant cheating hospitals, municipalities and state agencies out of much needed resources,” said Attorney General Madigan. “This settlement will help relieve some of the financial strain these entities have suffered as a result of the bank’s fraudulent practices.”

UBS is the second financial institution to settle with the multistate working group in the ongoing municipal bond derivatives investigation. In December 2010, Bank of America settled for $137 million, which included a $67 million settlement with Illinois and 18 other states for its involvement in the bid-rigging scheme.

Today’s settlement resolves allegations that from 2001 through 2004,the bank conspired with financial institutions and brokers to orchestrate bids for municipal derivatives circumventing the competitive bidding process. In some instances, UBS and other financial institutions communicated directly with one another, and not through brokers, to fix prices for bids or to fix the rates or key terms of these transactions. Brokers also frequently offered UBS and other financial entities the unfair advantage of reviewing other bids, thus rigging who would win the deal. In some instances, UBS acted as the broker.

UBS’s practices illegally and unreasonably restrained competition in the marketing, sale and placement of these municipal derivatives in violation of Illinois’ antitrust laws. This conduct financially harmed the municipalities, local and state agencies and nonprofits that relied on UBS’s services. Several Illinois municipalities, state agencies and nonprofits that purchased a municipal derivative from UBS or used UBS as a broker will be eligible to receive restitution as part of this settlement.

Other states joining Illinois in the UBS settlement include Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Tennessee and Wisconsin, as well as the District of Columbia.

Municipalities, schools and other organizations typically issue municipal bonds to fund capital projects. Once bonds are issued, the money is typically placed into accounts to spend as the local entity incurs expenses for the project. Because the money from the bonds does not need to be spent immediately, the municipality or other agency that issued the bonds typically seeks out ways to invest the money and may also use strategies to manage or transfer the bond’s interest rate risk. These investment accounts and risk management products – which are collectively called “municipal bond derivatives” – are provided bylarge financial institutions.

The states’ investigation into financial institutions involved in this scheme remains ongoing in conjunction with a federal investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice, Securities and Exchange Commission and the Internal Revenue Service.

Bureau Chief Robert W. Pratt and Assistant Attorney General Jamie Manning are handling this case for Madigan’s Antitrust Bureau.

What You Need to Know About the State of Urban Jobs!

Posted by Admin On May - 6 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

(Reprint From the National Urban League’s Monthly Employment Report 2011)

NUL’s State of Urban Jobs site at iamempowered.com gives you everything you need to know about jobs including the monthly employment report with stats for Blacks, Whites and Latinos, the National Urban League’s position on employment and job creation policy, the facts about how investing in job creation is the best strategy for reducing the deficit, as well as resume writing tips and job listings. Click here to view and stay abreast of the latest developments.

Join Dr. Valerie Rawlston Wilson today, May 6, 2011 from 2:00pm-3:00pm ET for a live online web chat about the April 2011 Employment report and The State of Black America 2011, Jobs Rebuild America: Putting Urban America Back to Work on IAmEmpowered.com

Highlights of the April 2011 Employment Report:

The unemployment rate moved up slightly – now 9.0% (from 8.8% in March).  The black unemployment rate increased to 16.1% (from 15.5%) – the unemployment rate for black men was up to 17.0% (from 16.8%); for black women, up to 13.4% (from 12.5%). The unemployment rate for whites was 8.0% (from 7.9%) while the Hispanic rate was 11.8% (from 11.3%).  Rates of teen unemployment were 22.3% for whites (from 21.6%), 41.6% for African-Americans (from 42.1%) and 23.4% for Latinos (from 31.9%). The rate of underemployment (including the unemployed, marginally attached and those working part-time for economic reasons) was 15.9% (from 15.7%).

The ranks of long-term unemployed (jobless for 27 weeks or more) remains elevated – now at 5.8 million (from 6.1 million) or 43.4% of all unemployed.

The April 2011 Employment report is available at the State of Urban Jobs website.  For more information on state and regional unemployment statistics for March 2011 (latest available), click here.  For more information on metropolitan area unemployment statistics for March 2011 (latest available), click here.  Also, available from the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee (JEC), the March 2011 edition of its state-by-state snapshots which detail each individual state’s economic progress for the previous month.

California Acupuncture Bill, aimed at “protecting” Chinese culture, has Koreans irked

Posted by Admin On May - 6 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

(From New America Media)

By Aruna Lee and Summer Chiang

State Sen. Leland Yee, who earlier this year stirred up controversy with his opposition to a ban on the sale of shark fin, is now embroiled in a similar debate over a bill that would put the word “Chinese” in the name of the state’s acupuncture licensing agency.

Senate Bill 628, which Yee introduced in February, would change the name of the California Acupuncture Board to the Traditional Chinese Medicine Board and would include practitioners who work in traumatology, the treatment of injuries. Chinese medicine practitioners welcomed the bill’s expansion of licensing to fields beyond acupuncture. But the proposal was met with strong opposition from members of the state’s Korean community, who say the name change ignores the fact that many Koreans continue to practice a similar form of medicine.

Yee is running for mayor in San Francisco, a city that is roughly one-fifth Chinese. He lacks the support of influential Chinatown leader Rose Pak, who helped engineer the appointment of interim Mayor Ed Lee and has been trying to persuade Lee to run in November. Yee’s decision in February to side with the Chinese community over environmentalists in opposing a ban on the sale of shark fin drew considerable controversy.

The acupuncture proposal appears to be winning Yee favor among Chinese-Americans. Three hundred supporters, mainly from the Bay Area, attended a hearing in Sacramento Monday when the bill was being discussed. Meanwhile, on Tuesday, the American Traditional Chinese Medical Traumatology Association hosted a news conference in San Francisco’s Chinatown in support of the legislation.

The measure has already cleared the Senate Committee on Business, Professions and Economic Development. If it passes, California will become the first state to license practitioners of traditional medical traumatology, according to the World Journal.

Ho Ying Heng, president of the American Traditional Chinese Medical Traumatology Association, told the World Journal that Leland Yee had visited China three times to learn more about Chinese traumatology. If the bill passes, he said, it will mean a lot to the Chinese community and the traumatology industry.

Iun Kang Cen, executive secretary of the American Traditional Chinese Medical Traumatology Association, added that the bill would give patients more protection, since the practice of traditional Chinese traumatology would be monitored by a government agency.

But an article in the Korea Times notes that another part of the bill — which would rename “acupuncturists” licensed by the board “Chinese medicine practitioners” — has generated controversy among Korean traditional medicine practitioners.

Soon after Yee’s proposal was announced, the Korea Times reports, the Association of Korean Asian Medicine and Acupuncture of California gathered more than 3,000 signatures statewide to oppose the name change. During a meeting with Yee in early March, the group urged him to back away from the new name, describing it as “offensive” to Korean and other Asian communities.

In-soon Lee, the head of the association’s Northern California branch, runs a private clinic in San Jose that administers traditional Korean medicine to patients. She said there are “over 50 members” in Northern California, all of whom run similar clinics. “They all participated in the petition opposing the name change,” Lee said.

For his part, Yee explained that the existing title of the board does not do justice to the range of treatment administered by licensed practitioners, including herbal remedies, massage therapy and dietary recommendations. Yee called on fellow Chinese-Americans to support the bill “to protect our culture.”

Yee has since backed away from the name-change issue, telling those gathered at the hearing Monday that he would reconsider whether or not to change the name.

But some in the Korean community remain skeptical.

In-soon Lee told the Korea Times that while she welcomed Yee’s decision to reconsider the change, she suspects it has more to do with his mayoral ambitions in San Francisco than with her group’s concerns.

“If he makes a similar proposal in the future, we will be there to oppose it,” she said.

State Sen. Leland Yee, who earlier this year stirred up controversy with his opposition to a ban on the sale of shark fin, is now embroiled in a similar debate over a bill that would put the word “Chinese” in the name of the state’s acupuncture licensing agency.

Senate Bill 628, which Yee introduced in February, would change the name of the California Acupuncture Board to the Traditional Chinese Medicine Board and would include practitioners who work in traumatology, the treatment of injuries. Chinese medicine practitioners welcomed the bill’s expansion of licensing to fields beyond acupuncture. But the proposal was met with strong opposition from members of the state’s Korean community, who say the name change ignores the fact that many Koreans continue to practice a similar form of medicine.

Yee is running for mayor in San Francisco, a city that is roughly one-fifth Chinese. He lacks the support of influential Chinatown leader Rose Pak, who helped engineer the appointment of interim Mayor Ed Lee and has been trying to persuade Lee to run in November. Yee’s decision in February to side with the Chinese community over environmentalists in opposing a ban on the sale of shark fin drew considerable controversy.

The acupuncture proposal appears to be winning Yee favor among Chinese-Americans. Three hundred supporters, mainly from the Bay Area, attended a hearing in Sacramento Monday when the bill was being discussed. Meanwhile, on Tuesday, the American Traditional Chinese Medical Traumatology Association hosted a news conference in San Francisco’s Chinatown in support of the legislation.

The measure has already cleared the Senate Committee on Business, Professions and Economic Development. If it passes, California will become the first state to license practitioners of traditional medical traumatology, according to the World Journal.

Ho Ying Heng, president of the American Traditional Chinese Medical Traumatology Association, told the World Journal that Leland Yee had visited China three times to learn more about Chinese traumatology. If the bill passes, he said, it will mean a lot to the Chinese community and the traumatology industry.

Iun Kang Cen, executive secretary of the American Traditional Chinese Medical Traumatology Association, added that the bill would give patients more protection, since the practice of traditional Chinese traumatology would be monitored by a government agency.

But an article in the Korea Times notes that another part of the bill — which would rename “acupuncturists” licensed by the board “Chinese medicine practitioners” — has generated controversy among Korean traditional medicine practitioners.

Soon after Yee’s proposal was announced, the Korea Times reports, the Association of Korean Asian Medicine and Acupuncture of California gathered more than 3,000 signatures statewide to oppose the name change. During a meeting with Yee in early March, the group urged him to back away from the new name, describing it as “offensive” to Korean and other Asian communities.

In-soon Lee, the head of the association’s Northern California branch, runs a private clinic in San Jose that administers traditional Korean medicine to patients. She said there are “over 50 members” in Northern California, all of whom run similar clinics. “They all participated in the petition opposing the name change,” Lee said.

For his part, Yee explained that the existing title of the board does not do justice to the range of treatment administered by licensed practitioners, including herbal remedies, massage therapy and dietary recommendations. Yee called on fellow Chinese-Americans to support the bill “to protect our culture.”

Yee has since backed away from the name-change issue, telling those gathered at the hearing Monday that he would reconsider whether or not to change the name.

But some in the Korean community remain skeptical.

In-soon Lee told the Korea Times that while she welcomed Yee’s decision to reconsider the change, she suspects it has more to do with his mayoral ambitions in San Francisco than with her group’s concerns.

“If he makes a similar proposal in the future, we will be there to oppose it,” she said.

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Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

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