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Archive for May 29th, 2014

Maya Angelou “…was a storyteller – and her greatest stories were true…”: President Barack Obama

Posted by Admin On May - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

President Obama’s Statement on the passing of Maya Angelou

“When her friend Nelson Mandela passed away last year, Maya Angelou wrote that “No sun outlasts its sunset, but will rise again, and bring the dawn.”

“Today, Michelle and I join millions around the world in remembering one of the brightest lights of our time – a brilliant writer, a fierce friend, and a truly phenomenal woman.  Over the course of her remarkable life, Maya was many things – an author, poet, civil rights activist, playwright, actress, director, composer, singer and dancer.  But above all, she was a storyteller – and her greatest stories were true.  A childhood of suffering and abuse actually drove her to stop speaking – but the voice she found helped generations of Americans find their rainbow amidst the clouds, and inspired the rest of us to be our best selves.  In fact, she inspired my own mother to name my sister Maya.

“Like so many others, Michelle and I will always cherish the time we were privileged to spend with Maya.  With a kind word and a strong embrace, she had the ability to remind us that we are all God’s children; that we all have something to offer.  And while Maya’s day may be done, we take comfort in knowing that her song will continue, “flung up to heaven” – and we celebrate the dawn that Maya Angelou helped bring.”

NAACP Statement on Dr. Maya Angelou’s Passing

Posted by Admin On May - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

The NAACP released the following statements following the death of Dr. Maya Angelou:

Roslyn Brock, Chairman of the NAACP Board of Directors:
“Maya Angelou was a fearless writer, poet and activist who made the world a better place for her generation and those to follow. Her powerful words taught scores of young women, particularly those of color, to believe that they are phenomenal and that their voices should never be silenced. Dr. Angelou rose from poverty, segregation and violence to become a force on stage, screen and the printed page. Her legacy lives on in all of us.”

Lorraine C. Miller, Interim NAACP President and CEO:
“The world will miss the indomitable spirit and immeasurable brilliance of Maya Angelou. She was a literary genius and a civil rights activist who will be celebrated for years to come. I had the privilege of working with Dr. Angelou during my time with the Clinton Administration and found her to be a loving and caring woman. We talked politics and laughed a lot. More than simply a renowned poet, novelist and actress, Dr. Angelou was a pioneer, a jewel of a person and a force to be reckoned with. Her humor and wit will be sorely missed.”

Hilary O. Shelton, Washington Bureau Director and Senior Vice President for Advocacy and Policy:
“Maya Angelou was an extraordinarily gifted interpreter of the human condition for African Americans and so many others. Her words, whether delivered on a page or through oration, were deeply heartfelt and painfully clear. Her common touch and exceptional creative power helped so many diverse hearts find a common vision. She will be profoundly missed.”

Remembering Maya Angelou

Posted by Admin On May - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

By A. Barry Rand, AARP CEO

When I learned of Maya Angelou’s passing this morning, I remembered something she once wrote in Letter to My Daughter -“Try to be a rainbow in someone else’s cloud.”

Maya Angelou spent her entire life being a rainbow in someone else’s cloud. Through her 31 books, her poetry, her personal appearances and her other writings, she spread her legendary wisdom throughout the world, inspiring everyone who had the good fortune to come into contact with her personality and her work.

A former Poet Laureate of the United States, she was one of the great voices of contemporary literature and a remarkable Renaissance woman. An educator, historian, best-selling author, actress, playwright, civil-rights activist, producer and director, 12 of her books became best-sellers. She was nominated for three Grammy Awards, and she received more than 50 honorary degrees from colleges and universities world- wide. She achieved ultimate recognition in 2010 when President Obama bestowed on her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor.

Maya Angelou was a long-time friend of AARP and of people 50+. She entertained and enlightened audiences at our National Event & Expo for many years as our members listened in on her intimate conversations with luminaries such as Quincy Jones, Norman Lear, Whoopi Goldberg and others. “At 50,” she told us, “you become the person you always wanted to be.”

In 2010, I had the distinct honor and pleasure of presenting Maya Angelou with the AARP Andrus Award, our association’s highest honor. Then 82, her body was frail, but her mind was sharp and her spirit was strong. She was certainly a rainbow in all of our clouds that evening.

Then, when AARP Foundation President, JoAnn Jenkins, asked her to lend her voice to an AARP Foundation video, she didn’t hesitate-masterfully and eloquently speaking for and to the nation’s most vulnerable and often forgotten older Americans.

Maya Angelou once remarked, “When I try to describe myself to God I say, “Lord, remember me? Black? Female? Six-foot tall? The writer? And I almost always get God’s attention.”

On this day, Maya Angelou has God’s full attention. And though we mourn her passing, we will forever know that she remains a rainbow in all of our clouds.

ICIRR Calls on President Obama to Reconsider Delay to Administrative Review of Deportations; Calls Out “Do-Nothing Republicans” for Continuing to Block Immigration Reform

Posted by Admin On May - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

The following is a statement by the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (ICIRR) responding to President Obama’s delay of DHS policy changes


The Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (ICIRR) calls on President Obama and Department of Homeland Security chief Jeh Johnson to stop putting politics before families and reconsider delaying administrative relief for deportations. Two million deportations are too many, and for the 1,100 deported per day it will be two months too many. We urge President Obama to act on administrative relief now.

Every day that passes without administrative relief is another day where our mothers and fathers, our daughters and sons are separated by the broken immigration system. 60,000 people will be deported between now and August, an unconscionable delay.


“The President says that he is giving House Republicans enough space to pass immigration reform in this session of Congress,”  said ICIRR’s CEO Lawrence Benito.  “But for thousands of families who will be torn apart in the coming weeks, simply hoping House Republicans will act on immigration reform is nothing more than an empty promise.”


ICIRR will continue to demand that US House Republican leaders John Boehner, Eric Cantor, and Peter Roskam to do the right thing and bring immigration reform to the House floor for an immediate vote.


The Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights is a statewide coalition of more than 130 organizations dedicated to promoting the rights of immigrants and refugees to full and equal participation in the civic, cultural, social, and political life of our diverse society. For more information, visit www.icirr.org.

ICIRR is a member of the Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM), the nation’s largest coalition of grassroots immigrant-rights organizations, with groups organizing for immigrant justices at the local, state and federal level in more than 30 states. For more information, go to fairimmigration.org, or follow FAIR on Facebook and Twitter.

Sweatfree Ordinance offers opportunity for City to take stand against Child Labor & Sweatshop Manufactured Uniforms for City Workers

Posted by Admin On May - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

CHICAGO, IL — On the heels of the one-year anniversary of the deadliest garment industry disaster in history at Rana Plaza in Bangladesh, Alderman Ameya Pawar along with Aldermen of the Asian American caucus and the Latino caucus introduced an ordiance ensuring that Chicago workers’ uniforms are not manufactured using sweatshop or child labor. They have worked closely with Chicago Fair Trade a coalition of organizations that works to increase support for ethical and fair trade products.

A year ago, one thousand one hundred and twenty nine garment workers died, and over 2500 were injured in the Rana Plaza collapse. The New York Times reported that military and other national institution garments have been produced at sweatshops in Bangladesh, Thailand, and Cambodia, some of which employ children, and where workers earn only dollars a day, face verbal and physical abuse. At factories with U.S. federal contracts, workers have reported wage theft, being beaten for failing to meet quotas, and soiling themselves because of restricted bathroom breaks.


“The consumer choices we make here in Chicago shape the lives of workers and producers around the world,” said Katherine Bissell Cordova, Executive Director of Chicago Fair Trade.  “Those choices can enrich or impoverish, they can empower or enslave.”


Alderman Ameya Pawar has taken the lead with this ordinance, in collaboration with the Mayor’s  Office of Community Engagement and following the example of over 40 other cities, including L.A., St. Louis, Milwaukee, and Boston, passing Sweatfree ordinances.  This is  a response to both the resent factory tragedies, and the failure to prevent procurement of sweatshop apparel by federal legislation. The ordinance would ensure transparency in the procurement of uniforms for city workers, including for police and firefighters.


U.S. apparel companies have tried to distance themselves from stories of sweatshops in other countries.  This ordinance would require reporting of their supply chain.  ” Unless we the residents of Chicago take control of how our tax dollars are spent and insist on sweatfree goods, US-based suppliers and brands can continue to shirk responsibility and hide behind an ever more complex and opaque supply chain, ” said Jamie Hayes, Chicago fashion designer and volunteer at Chicago Fair Trade.


Press conference and sweatfree campaign is organized by Chicago Fair Trade, which represents over 70 local businesses, organizations, religious congregations, and educational institutions. www.chicagofairtrade.org

Congresssional Black Caucus Members to Host “Educational Success for Black Men and Boys in a Post Brown v. Board of Education Era” Panel and Discussion

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WASHINGTON, DC – On Thursday, May 29 (today),  members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) will host “Educational Success for Black Men and Boys in a Post Brown v. Board of Education Era,” to discuss policies and priorities that will help eliminate systemic barriers for educational success. The panel discussion is open to the public and will be streamed live at cbc.fudge.house.gov.

HOSTS:

Rep. Frederica S. Wilson
Rep. Alcee L. Hastings
Rep. Chaka Fattah
Rep. Robert C. “Bobby” Scott
Rep. Danny K. Davis

WHAT: “Educational Success for Black Men and Boys in a Post Brown v. Board of Education Era” Panel and Discussion

Moderator: Jonathan Capehart, Columnist, Washington Post and Contributor, MSNBC
Panelists: Judith Browne Dianis, Co-Director, Advancement Project
Dr. Roy Jones, Executive Director, Call Me MISTER, Clemson University
Dr. Leticia Smith-Evans, Interim Director of Education Practice, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.
Dr. Ivory Toldson, Associate Professor, Howard University, and Deputy Director, White House Initiative on HBCUs

WHEN: Thursday, May 29, 2014
2:00- 4:00 PM

WHERE: 2226 Rayburn House Office Building

WHY: In May 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that “separate but equal” was unconstitutional. Yet after six decades, equal access to a quality education is not a reality for millions of students, many of whom live in poverty and are children of color. This panel will discuss what policymakers, educators and community leaders can do together to close this gap. In addition to the panel discussion, the National Education Association will present research highlighting programs that have helped African American male students excel in school.

The panel discussion is open to the public and will be streamed live at cbc.fudge.house.gov.

Contact: For more information, please contact Keenan Austin at Keenan.Austin@mail.house.gov or (202) 225-4506.

FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Designates the First 12 Manufacturing Communities through the Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership to Spur Investment and Create Jobs

Posted by Admin On May - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

America’s middle class was built on the strength of our manufacturing sector.  Today, five years after we pulled our economy back from the brink of collapse, manufacturers have created 647,000 jobs.  But there’s more work to do to create more of these good jobs making things the rest of the world buys, and President Obama has focused on boosting U.S. manufacturing by rewarding companies that create jobs here, rescuing the U.S. auto industry and expanding exports.

To build on this momentum in manufacturing, the Obama Administration launched the Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership (IMCP) last September– an initiative to spur communities to develop integrated, long-term economic development strategies that strengthen their competitive edge in attracting global manufacturers and their supply chains to our local communities—increasing investment and creating jobs. IMCP specifically brings together the resources of multiple federal departments and agencies to support strong local economic development plans.

Today, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker is announcing the first 12 communities that will be designated Manufacturing Communities as part of the second phase of the IMCP.  Selected out of more than 70 communities that applied, these 12 communities developed strong economic development plans and have deep partnerships in place across the public and private sectors to carry out their plans.

The first 12 Manufacturing Communities designated by the Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership are:

  • Southwest Alabama led by the University of South Alabama
  • Southern California led by the University of Southern California Center for Economic Development
  • Northwest Georgia led by the Northwest Georgia Regional Commission
  • The Chicago metro region led by the Cook County Bureau of Economic Development
  • South Kansas led by Wichita State University
  • Greater Portland region in Maine led by the Greater Portland Council of Governments
  • Southeastern Michigan led by the Wayne County Economic Development Growth Engine
  • The New York Finger Lakes region led by the City of Rochester
  • Southwestern Ohio Aerospace Region led by the City of Cincinnati
  • The Tennessee Valley led by the University of Tennessee
  • The Washington Puget Sound region led by the Puget Sound Regional Council
  • The Milwaukee 7 Region led by the Redevelopment Authority of the City of Milwaukee

Eleven federal agencies with $1.3 billion in economic development funds will be able to use the designees’ plans to make targeted investments in demonstrably strong public-private partnerships to strengthen regional manufacturing. In addition, each designated community will also receive a federal liaison and branding and promotion as a designated Manufacturing Community to help attract additional private investment and partnerships.

Later this year, the Administration will launch a second Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership competition to designate the next round of communities. In the meantime, the Administration and federal agencies will work with all the applicant communities to help them strengthen their plans and to identify opportunities for communities to work with the federal government on their local economic development priorities.

And later this year, the White House will convene the more than seventy communities that applied for the Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership to share best practices in economic development planning and attracting new jobs and investment in manufacturing.

IMCP Manufacturing Communities:

Southwest Alabama
Home to 14 major shipbuilders and many more small manufacturers making everything from U.S. Navy vessels to commercial tug boats, Mobile, Alabama and the surrounding Southwest Alabama area, including Baldwin, Choctaw, Clarke, Conecuh, Escambia, Mobile, Monroe, and Washington counties, led by the University of South Alabama, are strengthening and expanding their workforce partnerships to compete for shipbuilding and aerospace manufacturing.

Southern California
At the vanguard of innovation in aerospace manufacturing and home to innovative companies like SpaceX, AeroVironment, and Sapphire Energy, the Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, and Ventura counties, led by the University of Southern California Center for Economic Development, are investing in infrastructure to reduce shipping costs, higher today due to congestion by 50-250%, and developing a regional workforce training consortium in manufacturing.

Northwest Georgia
Called the “Carpet Capital of the World” for producing over 70% of the nation’s carpet, the Dalton County and Northwest Georgia region led by the Northwest Georgia Regional Commission is transferring innovations from its universities into its local supply chain and out into the skills of its workforce to spur a more sustainable floor covering industry.

The Chicago Metro Region
Home to 3,700 metals and machining companies, the Chicago metro region including Cook, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, McHenry, and Will counties, led by the Cook County Bureau of Economic Development, has formed an integrated strategy to strengthen its lead in metals and machining leveraging local strengths like its strong transportation access – including six Class 1 railroads, seven interstates, and the nation’s second busiest cargo airport.

South Kansas
The 27-county region around Wichita, Kansas is the most manufacturing-specialized metro area in the country with 32% of employment in manufacturing, half of which is in the aerospace supply chain. Led by Wichita State University, South Kansas is leveraging shared research and innovation facilities to compete on the frontier of advanced materials used in planes, cutting-edge machinery, and refineries.

Greater Portland Region in Maine
With arguably more breweries per capita than anywhere else in the country and over 60 food processers and hundreds of home microbusinesses, Cumberland County, home to Portland, Maine, is a food processing powerhouse. Led by the Greater Portland Council of Governments, the community is upgrading its port and improving the transportation and distribution efficiency of its supply chains to grow its lead in sustainable food production.

Southeastern Michigan
Thirteen counties in Southeastern Michigan, including the cities of Detroit, Flint, Lansing, Ann Arbor, and Pontiac, produce 22% of all vehicles made in America and at $14 billion a year, account for over 70% of total U.S. auto research investment. Led by the Wayne County Economic Development Growth Engine, Southeastern Michigan is building on its strengths in connected-vehicle technologies, including technologies that allow cars to communicate with each other and with the road to carry their passengers more safely and efficiently to their destinations.

The New York Finger Lakes Region
With over 120 photonics manufacturers and more than 500 photonics patents last year alone, the Greater Rochester region, led by the City of Rochester, is bringing new life to manufacturing business parks and expanding its workforce development efforts to maintain its historic lead in precision machining and optics, photonics, and imaging.

Southwestern Ohio Aerospace Region
The birthplace of modern aviation, with over 116,000 manufacturing workers across all stages of the aerospace supply chain, the 27 counties along the I-75 Corridor, led by the City of Cincinnati, are expanding industry-led curriculum and training and launching efforts to certify more small manufacturers for aerospace manufacturing.

The Tennessee Valley
In the past two years alone, more than 150 auto and auto parts manufacturers have announced expansions or new facilities in the Tennessee Valley automotive region, which spans 69 counties in Tennessee and portions of southern Kentucky, north Alabama, and north Georgia. Led by the University of Tennessee, the region is better connecting its nationally renowned research institutions with manufacturers to move up the value chain in automotive manufacturing.

The Washington Puget Sound Region
The counties along the I-90 and I-5 Aerospace Corridors in Washington State host the largest aerospace cluster in the world, with over 132,000 aerospace-related employees and more than 1,350 aerospace firms. Led by the Puget Sound Regional Council, the region is working with local employers to identify training needs and to develop new manufacturing capabilities to strength its aerospace supply chains.

The Milwaukee 7 Region
Known as the “Machine Shop of the World”, the seven-county Milwaukee region in Southeast Wisconsin employs than 15% of its workforce in manufacturing. Led by the Redevelopment Authority of the City of Milwaukee, the region is building on its historic strengths in precision machining to attract new jobs and investment in energy and power, water technologies, and food and beverage manufacturing.

Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership to Spur Investment and Create Jobs

  • Appalachian Regional Commission
  • Delta Regional Authority
  • Environmental Protection Agency
  • National Science Foundation
  • Small Business Administration
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • U.S. Department of Commerce
  • U.S. Department of Defense
  • U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • U.S. Department of Labor
  • U.S. Department of Transportation

Source: Whitehouse.gov.

Attorney General Madigan: Lawmakers Pass Bill to Expand Access to Emergency Epinephrine in Illinois Schools

Posted by Admin On May - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS
House Bill 5892 Sent to Governor to Better Protect Children from Deadly Allergic Reactions

SPRINGFIELD, IL — Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan announced that Senate lawmakers voted to expand access to emergency epinephrine in Illinois schools to protect children from deadly allergic reactions.
Senate members voted 56-0 today to send House Bill 5892 to the governor to increase access to emergency epinephrine under the Illinois Emergency Epinephrine Act, which was originally drafted by Madigan’s office.

Implemented in 2011, the current law allows school nurses to administer emergency epinephrine auto-injectors to students without known allergies who appear to be in anaphylactic shock. The Act also allows schools to keep emergency epinephrine auto-injectors for students who are authorized to self-administer the dosage during a reaction, and it allows for any school personnel to administer the auto-injector for students who have a medical plan in place.

The bill, sponsored by Sen. Andy Manar, would expand the law by allowing any trained school employee or volunteer to administer an epinephrine auto-injector for any person with an unknown allergy believed to be in anaphylactic shock. This change would greatly increase access to emergency epinephrine in the many Illinois schools without school nurses on staff. The expansion is critical because studies show 25 percent of first-time allergic reactions among children occur at school.

“Increasing access to emergency epinephrine in schools is a simple yet critical safety measure we need to take to address the growing number of children living with potentially life-threatening food allergies,” Madigan said.
Currently, 37 states allow trained personnel, in addition to school nurses, to administer an emergency epinephrine auto-injector for a student with an unknown allergy. In Virginia, which is among those 37 states, 448 emergency epinephrine auto-injectors were administered during the 2012-2013 school year. Of those incidents, 75 percent involved individuals who had no previously known allergy.

“More and more children are being diagnosed with food allergies, with peanuts, eggs, milk, soy, and wheat as the most common culprits,” said Sen. Manar. “Ensuring timely access to this life-saving medication can mean the difference between life and death for a child.”

The bill would extend liability protection to advanced practice nurses and physician assistants who provide standing protocols and prescriptions for emergency epinephrine, further enabling schools to obtain prescriptions to keep auto-injectors on hand in the event a person suffers an allergic reaction. The bill also requires schools to report every administration of emergency epinephrine to the Illinois State Board of Education to allow educators and medical professionals to better plan for emergencies.

Rep. Michelle Mussman sponsored the bill in the House.
“I am very proud to be working with the Attorney General’s office and all concerned parties to clarify and improve the Emergency Epinephrine Act. Food allergies are on the rise and it is vital that children and adults in our school buildings have timely access to this life-saving medication,” said Rep. Mussman.

NFL Tight End Uses His Hands to Catch More than Just Footballs

Posted by Admin On May - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

National Bowl Champion, Tory Humphrey reaches down to give local churches a hand up using his design company, Project 1 Design, a design company specializing in high end graphics

Detroit, MI (BlackNews.com) — Tory Humphrey, free agent Tight End is using his hands to catch Christian churches and organizations from closing their doors to the public. Tory knows firsthand about setbacks. As the beginning stages of his young NFL career was plagued with multiple injuries. It was Tory’s faith that enabled him to get through those rough patches in his life.

Tory wants to take his off the field talent of business development and graphic design to help those struggling in the Christian community. He wants to help them win against the financial opposition challenging them to keep their doors open through the week, especially on Sunday morning.

While Tory awaits another opportunity to suit up for organized football. He has been assisting various Christian Organizations rebrand themselves to enter the marketplace. His company, Project 1 Design is a young company that has a mature approach to business, and passion for serving others. Project 1 Design has launched “Start Your Own T-shirt Business,” where the goal of the young company is to flood the apparel market with positive and inspirational T-shirts.

“I enjoy hearing the message, but I love when we become the message.”

To learn more about Tory Humphrey, visit www.Project1d.com. We are currently scheduling interviews, Business Development presentations, and speaking engagements.

Photo Caption: NFL Veteran Tight End, Tory Humphrey

Explore Secret Stories and Places of Music History

Posted by Admin On May - 29 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Chicago Detours to Offer Chicago Blues History Bus Tour on June 14

CHICAGO, IL– On Saturday, June 14th, before the Chicago Blues Festival performances begin, Chicago Detours will host a “Chicago Blues Tour with Jazz” of stories and places of Chicago music history that even jazz and blues aficionados don’t know about. This two-and-a-half-hour special bus tour, which begins at 10:30am and is offered only once a year to the public, ventures to Chicago neighborhoods north and south. The tour integrates historic videos and photos, expert guide commentary, a live blues performance, and exclusive entrance to see hidden relics of a historic jazz club. (See a sneak peek in this video.)

Amanda Scotese, Executive Director of Chicago Detours, curated the “Chicago Blues Tour by Bus with Jazz” with a journalistic approach by consulting with local experts, such as music photographer Paul Natkin and former Blues Festival director Barry Dolins. “We curate our tours to include the perspectives of many people over history,” Scotese says. “We present documentary video clips of historic interviews, we share stories from primary sources, and we give tour guests information that we have uncovered from archival materials like personal letters, club flyers, and old magazines.”

The tour, which is normally only available for private groups, delves into the people, politics and culture that have made Chicago a hotbed for musical innovation. Tour guide Scotese will share vivid stories and thought-provoking perspectives on topics such as the Great Migration, Maxwell Street Market, Chess Records, and the evolution of the blues and jazz genres. The group will venture to Uptown, Bronzeville, South Loop, and the Near West Side.

Along with guide commentary, video screens on the bus illuminate the past through archival images. The photos and brief documentary clips include performances of musical artists, and historic pictures of recording studios, clubs and theaters.

A highlight for many prior guests on the tour is an exclusive visit to step on the stage of a former 1920’s and 1930’s jazz club where Louis Armstrong and Earl Hines once played. Additionally, guests learn to play blues harmonica with a Chicago blues musician who hops on board the bus.

Guests on past tours have described it in five-star Yelp reviews: “An amazing adventure,” “Loved the harmonica lesson,” and “This is a MUST DO if you live in Chicago.”

For this tour, to be held June 14th, 10:30am-1:00pm, guests meet at Jazz Record Mart, which is also the tour end location. To maintain a personal group dynamic, the group is capped at a maximum of 26 guests. Reservations are required via www.chicagodetours.com. Tickets for this premium experience are $65 for adults and $62 for students/seniors/children, and include transportation, tour guide commentary, multimedia presentation, live blues musician performance, harmonica lesson, and gifts. The “Chicago Blues ” sells out every year.

About Chicago Detours:
Chicago Detours offers guided tours of architecture, history and culture that bring curious people to explore stories and places locals don’t even know. The tour company is a team of educators, historians, artists and storytellers, founded by Amanda Scotese, who honed her skills as a tour professional during her work as a tour guide and guidebook researcher with Rick Steves. Chicago Detours is one of very few Chicago tour companies with five stars on both Yelp and TripAdvisor.

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Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

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