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  Birmingham, AL (BlackNews.com) -- Attorney Earl F. Hilliard was recognized and honored by the National ...
 Residents in Western Cook County now eligible   Chicago, IL - Residents and business owners in Chicago’s ...
New book by author and educator shares Kwanzaa Principles as a model for increasing organization ...
WASHINGTON, DC - With billions of dollars being spent each year in the national ...
 Funds from Legal Settlement Will Feed People in Need in All 102 Counties                              Chicago, ...
Judge Gets Jail Time in Racketeering Case In a case that exposed widespread corruption in a ...
The Cook County agency responsible for sewage treatment and stormwater management for the five million ...
Five plays by Pulitzer Prize-winning writers Subscribe to Steppenwolf's  landmark 40th season and see five not-to-miss ...
Special events planned throughout the state SPRINGFIELD, IL – Governor Pat Quinn proclaimed October as ...
Push back meeting set for today   By Chinta Strausberg   A number of clergy will be meeting ...

Archive for August 30th, 2011

$45 million available to build and expand early childhood services

Posted by Admin On August - 30 - 2011 36 COMMENTS

Capital construction grants now available for early childhood services

 

 $45 million appropriation will create more than 300

construction jobs, meet educational needs in underserved areas

 

Springfield, IL – Applications are now being accepted for construction grants to increase the availability of early childhood services in underserved areas of Illinois.  The grants are part of a $45 million appropriation under Governor Pat Quinn’s Illinois Jobs Now! capital construction program.  The projects funded by the grants will create more than 300 construction jobs.

Illinois public school districts or not for profit entities may apply for up to $5 million in funding, with a required ten percent funding match, for grants that will construct, acquire, renovate, equip, or expand facilities that serve the educational needs of children ages zero to five in underserved areas of the state.  Applications will be accepted through November 14, 2011.  The grant program is administered by the Capital Development Board (CDB) in consultation with the Illinois State Board of Education.  Links to the grant application and rules are available at www.cdb.state.il.us.

 “These early childhood education grants will increase badly needed services for Illinois families, plus they will create hundreds of construction jobs for Illinois workers.  This is a win-win situation,” said CDB Executive Director Jim Underwood.

The Black Republican: Abraham Lincoln effigy doll is artifact of the month for September

Posted by Admin On August - 30 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

 

Each month, a different major artifact from the recently acquired Taper Collection will be featured at the Lincoln Presidential Museum

 

Springfield, IL – A “Black Republican” effigy doll depicting Abraham Lincoln, an unflattering likeness which his many detractors would stab with pins or burn, is the artifact of the month for September at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum (ALPLM), the latest in a series featuring key items from the Taper Collection recently acquired by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation.

“This is a very rare survival from the 1860s – an effigy doll ready for pricking or burning, with a black-cloth face under the paper Lincoln mask, to signal that he was a member of the so-called ‘Black Republicans’ who wanted to free the slaves,” said ALPLM Lincoln Curator James Cornelius.  “The bearded mask indicates the doll was used during the 1864 presidential election, essentially recycling the same racial hatreds of 1860.” 

The hostility Lincoln faced from a majority of Americans in 1860 – he won only 39.6% of the vote that year, by far the smallest victor’s total in presidential history – took many forms.  Reports of his effigy being burned at anti-Lincoln rallies spanned the country from Georgia to Oregon.  But by the 1864 election, Lincoln’s emancipation policy had begun to move the hearts of enough Northerners that his 1864 victory was clear.

The effigy doll will be taken off display on Friday, September 30, and another key artifact from the Taper Collection will take its place.

The artifacts of the month are displayed in the central case in the Presidential Museum’s Treasures Gallery and include interpretive text explaining their significance.  These displays also highlight the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation’s Permanent Home Campaign.  The $27 million fundraising drive, established to ensure that the 1,500-item Louise and Barry Taper Collection remains together as a collection and is preserved in perpetuity for the benefit of the public, began in 2008 and continues through 2013.

The story of the September 2011 artifact as told by the ALPLM’s Lincoln Curator may be viewed at:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6tFiB2nJ58.  A podcast may be accessed at: http://ow.ly/6e2pZ.

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation, in partnership with the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, offers monthly artifact sponsorships entitled “An Evening of Wine, a Nibble of Cheese, and A Hint of History.”  The private events, hosted by a Lincoln historian, highlight a featured artifact from the Taper Collection and include light hors d’oeuvres and wine for a select number of guests.  For more information on how to become a sponsor or to donate to the Permanent Home Campaign, contact Phyllis Maynerich at (217) 557-6250 or pmaynerich@alplm.org.  Event sponsorships are tax deductible as allowed by law.        

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation supports the educational and cultural programming of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum; fosters Lincoln scholarship through the acquisition and publication of documentary materials relating to Lincoln and his era; and promotes a greater appreciation of history through exhibits, conferences, publications, online services, and other activities designed to promote historical literacy.

Pastors back Mayor Emanuel on longer school day/year

Posted by Admin On August - 30 - 2011 42 COMMENTS

 CLERGY: “IT’s COOL TO BE SMART”

 

By Chinta Strausberg

In less than 10-days, 275,000 of the 400,000 Chicago Public School (CPS) students will be returning to the classroom, and Mayor Rahm Emanuel, CPS/CEO Jean Claude Brizard and more than 225 pastors had a singular message to the youth—go back to school on September 6th and every there after and they that children should know that “it’s cool to be smart.”

They also agreed to support Emanuel’s petition drive endorsing a longer school day and year that according to the mayor would bring the CPS system in line with other schools throughout the nation.

The ministers made the overwhelming endorsement during a back-to-school breakfast recently held at the US Cellular Field, 35th and Shields, where they were also joined by Police Supt. Garry McCarthy, other officials and clergy including Father Michael L. Pfleger.

“They are our children,” said the Mayor Emanuel. “They are the children we are accountable for and the children of the city of Chicago” he says have the shortest school day and the shortest school year in the nation.

Vance Henry, Deputy Chief of Staff, Community and Faith Based Initiatives for the mayor, said, “It’s cool to go back to school. I think young people clearly need to understand that by getting a solid education sets them up for a successful future, and it’s cool.

“It’s unfortunate that young people are subject to peer pressure and sometimes that’s negative, but we want them to know it’s cool to go back to school and it’s also cool to get a good education so they can have a bright future.”

Asked about those students who make trouble on the first day of school, Henry said, “Some of our misguided young people are children because we have to own them. Some of us some years ago traveled down those same wrong roads.”

Henry urged youth who are making wrong decisions to reach out to caring adults. “So often what happens with our misguided youth is that they don’t have good relationships with their parents who face challenges of joblessness, homelessness and sometimes drug addiction. What they need to know is that there are adults who care about them.”

To troubled youth, Henry sent them a message, “We love you. If there are issues or things that are contributing to you being in the wrong places at the wrong time with the wrong people, reach out to us, and we’ll do everything we can to love and support you, to love you and to help some of the things young people are frustrated and angry about.

“They just need to know somebody loves them. If I can do anything for young people who are hurting who are involved in a lot of violence and other activities that we know that will lead to their demise, reach out to us. Let us know what you need, and we’ll do everything we can to help and to love them,” said Henry.

Many pastors believe “an idle mind is a devil’s workshop” and that getting out of school at 1 p.m. or earlier leaves too much time for trouble to find them. They signed more than 200 petitions. CPS has a goal of 400 petitions which will be delivered to the City Council as a show of support.

“The mayor wants them (the alderman) to know that the faith community is supporting him on the extended school day,” said Rev. Renaldo Kyles, Interfaith director of the CPS. “It is important because our kids need to be school much longer than they are. We have the shortest school day in the U.S. It’s just fair to have our students in school longer.”

Apostle Ulysses Ruff, Sr, pastor of the Agape Family Life Center, said as a mentor at two public schools he learned the importance of having a consistent person working with the youth “to keep them interested in going to school and challenging them for what they’re going to do beyond that.”

Ruff said what is needed most is to have a positive role mentors in the lives of youth. “They need that more than anything else. I am disappointed to see a lot of the mentoring programs shut down this year, and I hope the school board will reconsider that and put some more mentors in our young men’s lives. It would help across the board from academics to violence to simply growing into a young man being and being responsible at home as well as in the street.”

Apostle Ruff said it’s time to have a citywide male mentorship program. “I also think there should be some industries to volunteer their time to inspire the youth in explaining how education connects to financial success later on in life. I think that is extremely important.”

Pastor Walter Turner, Pastor of New Spiritual Light MBC and President of the Baptist Minister’s Conference of Chicago & Vicinity, said students should understand the importance of education “because if they think education is costly, they need to try ignorance. It’s more expensive.”

Rev. Charles Jenkins, senior pastor at Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church, has a message to the students. “Full speed ahead…As school kicks off and as we get ready for a brand new school year, success has to be at the forefront of their minds. As a member of the faith community, faith without works is dead. Apply yourself and commit to a successful school year.”

When asked about students who may want to commit violence on the first day of school, Jenkins said, “It has to be a change of mind, of heart and a change of thinking. I think there’s got to be a commitment to win personally and to use your time to excel. Violence are acts of failure both personally and causing others to experience emotional and physical failure and so the theme is to succeed.”

Reminded that some students think being smart is not cool, Jenkins had some thoughts on that. “I think it is a wrong perspective, a wrong way of thinking.”

When he was younger, Jenkins said, “The perception of being cool was being hard, having some money in your pocket, the girls like you, but as you grow older, you don’t want to live your entire life like that and not have any education which leads to no opportunities to leads to potential homelessness.

“It is absolutely cool to be smart because it’s cool to have a job. It’s cool to be able to provide for your family, and it’s not cool to be sitting in a jail cell or to be sitting on a porch without anything. It’s got to be cool to be smart,” said Jenkins.

Pastor Roosevelt Watkins, pastor of Bethlehem Star Church, said he wants to see students be in the classroom on Sept. 6th “be prepared for school and do the best they can because education is the key to success. Without a proper education, children just won’t do as well.”

Asked about those who commit violence on the first day of school, Watkins referred to the once popular show, Baretta, and said, “You do the crime. You’re going to have to do the time. We have too many of our young teenagers locked up who could be in school and doing well in school.”

Referring to the citywide Safe Haven program involving 100 churches, Watkins said it provides anger management, conflict resolution, tutoring and mentoring for the youth. They also operate summer camp programs.

A retired school teacher, Dr. Mildred Harris, pastor God First Church In Ministries, believes the first day will be a “wonderful experience” and hopes the community will join in on this special day. She also supports the mayor’s extended day and year proposal. “When teachers and students come together with that kind of anticipation and working together, it’s a win-win situation.”

Do’Minique Thompson, a junior at Kenwood Academy, said she is excited and eager to get back to school. “I have dreams in life,” she said anxious to take a course in advance placement course in biology. Her goal is to become a biologist. “At Kenwood, we get out at 2:54 p.m.” She said the extra minutes won’t hurt.” Thompson said she believes longer hours will keep the youth out of trouble.

In support of both a longer school day and year, Bishop Simon Gordon, pastor of Triedstone Full Gospel Baptist Church, who credited Rainbow PUSH Coalition and community organizations, for urging youth to get back to school every year including having an detailed challenge, said: “It’s good that it is on the radar of the mayor and of the staff to make sure that we push it that also includes the church community as well.”

Saying he was a “3:15 p.m kid,” Gordon said he questioned when the school hours were changed. “I know we need some equity in the process in the way our children are taught.” Gordon said it is not about the quantity. It’s about the quality that is what should be emphasized.

Asked about his message to students, Gordon said, “It is very important for our students to make sure they make not only the first day of school but they continue on. School is so primary that subjects like math if you miss the foundations, you miss it for the rest of the year. It’s so important to start right so you can end up right.”

When asked about some students who may commit violence on the first day of school, Simon said, “Any youth that are committing violence our community must speak out about it, report it and cleared up so that our students who want to learn can have a good and clear education.”

. “It is important because our kids need to be school much longer than they are. We have the shortest school day in the U.S. It’s just fair to have our students in school longer,” said Rev. Renaldo Kyles, Interfaith director at the CPS.
Apostle Ulysses Ruff, Sr. Ruff said what is needed most is to have a positive role mentors in the lives of youth. “They need that more than anything else. I am disappointed to see a lot of the mentoring programs shut down this year, and I hope the school board will reconsider that and put some more mentors in our young men’s lives.
Pastor Walter Turner, Pastor of New Spiritual Light MBC and President of the Baptist Minister’s Conference of Chicago & Vicinity, said students should understand the importance of education “because if they think education is costly, they need to try ignorance. It’s more expensive.”
Rev. Charles Jenkins, senior pastor at Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church, has a message to the students. “Full speed ahead…As school kicks off and as we get ready for a brand new school year, success has to be at the forefront of their minds. As a member of the faith community, faith without works is dead. Apply yourself and commit to a successful school year.”
Pastor Roosevelt Watkins, pastor of the Bethlehem Star Church, was asked about youth who commit violence on the first day of school. Watkins referred to the once popular show, Baretta, and said, “You do the crime. You’re going to have to do the time. We have too many of our young teenagers locked up who could be in school and doing well in school.”
Vance Henry, Deputy Chief of Staff, Community and Faith Based Initiatives for the mayor, said, “It’s cool to go back to school. I think young people clearly need to understand that by getting a solid education sets them up for a successful future, and it’s cool.”
A retired school teacher, Dr. Mildred Harris, pastor God First Church In Ministries, believes the first day will be a “wonderful experience” and hopes the community will join in on this special day. She also supports the mayor’s extended day and year proposal. “When teachers and students come together with that kind of anticipation and working together, it’s a win-win situation.”
Do’Minique Thompson, a junior at Kenwood Academy, said she is excited and eager to get back to school. “I have dreams in life,” she said anxious to take a course in advance placement course in biology. Her goal is to become a biologist. “At Kenwood, we get out at 2:54 p.m.” She said the extra minutes won’t hurt.” Thompson said she believes longer hours will keep the youth out of trouble.

Photocaption:  Rev. Charles Jenkins, senior pastor at Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church, has a message to the students. “Full speed ahead…As school kicks off and as we get ready for a brand new school year, success has to be at the forefront of their minds. As a member of the faith community, faith without works is dead. Apply yourself and commit to a successful school year.”

Chinta Strausberg is a Journalist of more than 33-years, a former political reporter and a current PCC Network talk show host.

State Board awards nearly $46 million toward child development and support services for at-risk families with infants and toddlers

Posted by Admin On August - 30 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

Prevention Initiative Program helps build foundation for learning
 
Springfield, IL  – The Illinois State Board of Education announced that it has awarded nearly $46 million in state funds to 283 programs that support at-risk families with infants to 3-year olds as part of the Early Childhood Block Grant for fiscal year 2012. Additionally, the state awarded the Chicago-based Ounce of Prevention Fund with a $5 million grant to provide statewide technical assistance and training to these programs over the course of five years.

“Thanks to these funds, hundreds of struggling families receive support services to help ensure their children get off to a good start in life,’’ said Illinois State Board of Education Chairman Gery J. Chico. “Providing families with early support and services can make a critical difference in a child’s ability to later learn and thrive in the classroom.”

The Prevention Initiative grants, established in 1988 under the Illinois School Code, provide voluntary coordinated services for at-risk infants and toddlers and their families. These grants are funded through the state’s Early Childhood Block grant that primarily funds preschool programs for children ages 3 to 5. Prevention Initiative programs offer continuous, intensive and research-based child development and family support services for expecting parents and families with children from birth to age 3 to help them build a strong foundation for learning.
During the past year, more than 29,000 children and their families received services through Prevention Initiative programs. This fiscal year, 173 suburban and downstate programs applied for grant funding and 158 were chosen after an application and review process that included internal ISBE and external early childhood experts.

Another approximately 125 programs will be funded through Chicago School District 299’s portion of Early Childhood Block grant funds. The Early Childhood Block Grant requires that at least 11 percent of the grant be used to fund programs for children from birth to age 3 years.  For Chicago, this is a minimum of $13.2 million dollars of their block grant funds. Prevention Initiative Programs across the state may have multiple sites.

The Ounce of Prevention Fund will implement a comprehensive training and technical assistance system for Prevention Initiative Birth to Three programs. The Ounce will assist all programs to fulfill the statutory mandate to implement research-based, comprehensive child development and family support services. The Ounce must meet annual benchmarks under terms of the five-year grant.

“This program will allow more families and children to embark on a firm path toward better education, health and other outcomes,” said Diana Mendley Rauner, president of The Ounce of Prevention Fund.  “We look forward to helping those in our field create the nurturing and stimulating environments that we need to engage parents and children, starting at the earliest ages, so that they can succeed in school and in life.”

The following programs will be funded with Prevention Initiative Grants in FY12:

Entity

Serving County

FY 12
Funding

TRANSITIONS OF WESTERN ILLINOIS Adams

$159,600

LIBERTY CUSD 2 Adams

$48,443

EGYPTIAN COMM UNIT SCH DIST 5 Alexander

$72,562

CAIRO USD 1 Alexander

$89,500

BOND COUNTY CUSD 2 Bond

$53,000

BROWN COUNTY CUSD 1 Brown

$75,647

PRINCETON ELEM SCHOOL DIST 115 Bureau

$104,459

CALHOUN CUSD 40 Calhoun

$102,807

WEST CARROLL CUSD 314 Carroll

$120,235

BEARDSTOWN C U SCH DIST 15 Cass

$149,039

DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES CENTER Champaign

$178,982

URBANA SD 116 Champaign

$261,000

MENTAL HEALTH CENTER CHAMPAIGN Champaign

$246,994

MORRISONVILLE CUSD 1 Christian

$29,340

CHRISTIAN/MONTGOMERY ROE Christian/Montgomery

$473,641

CLAY COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT Clay

$160,000

FLORA CUSD 35 Clay

$85,000

WESCLIN CUSD 3 (Trenton) Clinton

$29,321

ST ROSE SCHOOL DISTRICT 14-15 Clinton

$16,067

COOK COUNTY SD 130 (Blue Island, Crestwood) Cook

$266,994

SCHAUMBURG CCSD 54 Cook

$140,000

THE CENTER:RESOURCES FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING Cook

$222,905

EVANSTON CCSD 65 Cook

$500,000

CHINESE AMERICAN SERVICE LEAGUE Cook

$140,000

ESD 159 (Matteson) Cook

$74,085

HARVEY SD 152 Cook

$233,057

TINLEY PARK CCSD 146 Cook

$92,575

BELLWOOD SD 88 Cook

$85,000

INFANT WELFARE SOCIETY Cook

$101,652

ACTION FOR CHILDREN Cook

$236,000

CHILDSERV Cook

$501,573

SCHILLER PARK SD 81 Cook

$141,466

W HARVEY-DIXMOOR PSD 147 Cook

$206,419

EL VALOR CORPORATION Cook

$443,198

ASIAN HUMAN SERVICES INC Cook

$85,382

BERWYN SOUTH SD 100 Cook

$93,410

EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN HAVE OPPORTUNITIES Cook

$1,097,042

CCSD 168 Cook

$218,659

BETHEL NEW LIFE Cook

$296,430

FOREST RIDGE SD 142 Cook

$132,059

MIDLOTHIAN SCHOOL DIST 143 Cook

$62,375

HENRY BOOTH HOUSE Cook

$177,480

TOWNSHIP HSD 214 Cook

$74,922

CCSD 62 Cook

$70,000

LYONS SD 103 Cook

$58,000

SAINT XAVIER UNIVERSITY Cook

$106,366

OUNCE OF PREVENTION FUND Cook

$909,234

SPEED SPECIAL EDUCATION JOINT AGREEMENT SCHOOL DISTRICT #802 Cook

$113,000

POSEN-ROBBINS ESD 143-5 Cook

$76,800

J S MORTON HSD 201 Cook

$93,766

CHILDRENS CENTER OF CICERO-BERWYN Cook

$522,643

LEES INFANT & CHILD CARE CENTER Cook

$83,182

CHILDRENS HOME AND AID SOCIETY Cook/McLean/Madison

$404,191

HUTSONVILLE C U SCHOOL DIST 1 Crawford

$50,300

ROBINSON C U SCHOOL DIST 2 Crawford

$55,521

DE KALB ROE DeKalb

$160,413

DEKALB CUSD 428 DeKalb

$70,996

BLUE RIDGE CUSD 18 Dewitt

$52,625

KEENEYVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT 20 DuPage

$53,200

GLEN ELLYN SD 41 DuPage

$34,000

WEST CHICAGO ESD 33 DuPage

$617,492

BENSENVILLE SD 2 DuPage

$50,000

DU PAGE ROE DuPage

$123,000

WOODRIDGE SD 68 DuPage

$150,000

NAPERVILLE CUSD 203 DuPage

$130,000

WOOD DALE SD 7 DuPage

$48,069

SHILOH COMM UNIT SCH DIST 1 Edgar

$65,120

PARIS-UNION SCHOOL DIST 95 Edgar

$83,864

NORTH GREENE UNIT DIST 3 Greene

$90,442

HAMILTON CO CUSD 10 Hamilton

$71,142

BUREAU/HENRY/STARK ROE Henry

$140,032

ABILITIES PLUS INC Henry/Stark

$110,160

CARBONDALE ESD 95 Jackson

$75,356

MURPHYSBORO CUSD 186 Jackson

$803,307

UNITY POINT CCSD 140 Jackson

$102,000

CARBONDALE COMM H S DISTRICT 165 Jackson

$141,000

ARCHWAY INC Jackson/Perry

$77,450

ARC COMMUNITY SUPPORT SYSTEMS Jasper/Richland/Lawrence/
Crawford

$166,592

JERSEY CUSD 100 Jersey

$125,000

ELGIN SD U-46 Kane

$327,896

SMARTSTEPS Kane

$173,900

KANE COUNTY Kane

$290,389

AURORA WEST USD 129 Kane

$88,000

AURORA EAST USD 131 Kane

$173,000

CUSD 300 Kane

$85,886

FAMILY FOCUS Kane/Cook/Lake

$1,371,149

PEMBROKE CCSD 259 Kankakee

$177,000

BRADLEY SD 61 Kankakee

$88,172

BOURBONNAIS SD 53 Kankakee

$47,812

KANKAKEE SD 111 Kankakee

$200,000

HERSCHER CUSD 2 Kankakee

$63,800

GALESBURG CUSD 205 Knox

$74,081

YWCA OF LAKE COUNTY Lake

$341,674

WAUKEGAN CUSD 60 Lake

$160,000

ANTIOCH CCSD 34 Lake

$57,650

OGLESBY ELEM SCH DIST 125 LaSalle

$43,962

MENDOTA CCSD 289 LaSalle

$62,025

SINNISSIPPI CTRS INC Lee

$230,000

LEE/OGLE ROE Lee/Ogle

$32,257

ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE Logan

$151,912

MACON RESOURCES INC Macon

$242,282

MACON/PIATT ROE Macon

$771,791

DECATUR SD 61 Macon

$281,648

ARGENTA-OREANA CUSD 1 Macon

$22,610

NORTHWESTERN CUSD 2 Macoupin

$40,200

CARE-O-SEL DAY CARE INC Macoupin

$122,019

ROXANA CUSD 1 Madison

$45,204

EAST ALTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 13 Madison

$171,321

ALTON CUSD 11 Madison

$192,084

TRIAD CUSD 2 Madison

$35,000

COLLINSVILLE C U SCH DIST 10 Madison

$142,538

EARLY EXPLORATIONS INC Madison

$134,519

WOOD RIVER-HARTFORD ESD 15 Madison

$45,000

GRANITE CITY CUSD 9 Madison

$95,676

MADISON CUSD 12 Madison

$127,300

HAVANA CUSD 126 Mason

$95,000

HANCOCK/MC DONOUGH ROE McDonough/Hancock/Fulton/
Schuyler

$271,468

HARVARD CUSD 50 McHenry

$40,271

WOODSTOCK CUSD 200 McHenry

$72,000

LEROY COMMUNITY UNIT SCH DIST 2 McLean

$34,298

DE WITT/LIVINGSTON/MCLEAN ROE McLean

$150,000

HILLSBORO CUSD 3 Montgomery

$51,216

NOKOMIS CUSD 22 Montgomery

$34,734

JACKSONVILLE SD 117 Morgan

$246,157

COMMUNITY CHLDCR & SVC CTR INC Morgan

$185,512

MOULTRIE COUNTY BEACON  INC Moultrie

$50,000

CRITTENTON CENTERS Peoria

$116,008

PEORIA HGHTS C U SCH DIST 325 Peoria

$140,000

Peoria Citizens Committee For Economic Opportunity, Inc Peoria

$166,188

CHILDRENS HOME ASSOC OF ILLINOIS Peoria

$305,182

BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF GTR PEORIA Peoria

$294,941

WESTERN CUSD 12 Pike

$51,237

CHESTER COMM UNIT SCH DIST 139 Randolph

$58,352

EAST RICHLAND CUSD 1 Richland

$120,747

ROCK ISLAND ROE Rock Island

$248,963

SPRINGFIELD SD 186 Sangamon

$335,848

NEW BERLIN CUSD 16 Sangamon

$54,998

HARMONY EMGE SD 175 St. Clair

$55,985

LESSIE BATES DAVIS NEIGHBORHOOD St. Clair

$437,000

BELLEVILLE SD 118 St. Clair

$81,595

MASCOUTAH CUD 19 St. Clair

$20,080

CARROLL/JO DAVIESS/STEPHENSON ROE Stephenson/Jo Daviess/ Carroll

$492,107

PEKIN PSD 108 Tazewell

$44,203

DEER CREEK-MACKINAW CUSD 701 Tazewell

$30,000

CENTER FOR CHILDRENS SER Vermillion

$167,200

DANVILLE CCSD 118 Vermillion

$83,390

WABASH C U SCH DIST 348 Wabash

$84,502

REGIONALOFFICE OF EDUCATION 27 Warren

$87,600

KIDDIE KOLLEGE OF FAIRFIELD Wayne

$156,013

WHITESIDE ROE Whiteside

$190,000

JOLIET TWP HS DIST 204 Will

$61,459

WILL COUNTY Will

$104,595

EASTER SEALS JOLIET REGION INC Will/Grundy/Kendall

$460,000

CARTERVILLE CUSD 5 Williamson

$160,632

HARLEM UD 122 Winnebago

$117,317

ROCKFORD SCHOOL DIST 205 Winnebago

$694,120

EL PASO-GRIDLEY CUSD 11 Woodford

$30,000

GERMANTOWN HILLS SCHOOL DIST 69 Woodford

$89,361

TOTAL – Outside City of Chicago

 

$27,483,019

Chicago Public Schools Early Childhood Block Grant – 125 Schools/Agency Centers Chicago/Cook

13,200,000

GRAND TOTAL

 

$40,683,019

 

 

 

Application deadlines approaching for 18th Annual Chicago Neighborhood Development Awards

Posted by Admin On August - 30 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

Celebrated annual awards recognize excellence in community development and architectural achievements in Chicago’s neighborhoods.

 

Chicago, IL – Chicago is known internationally as the “City of Neighborhoods” – a mosaic of vibrant interlocking communities and the people and projects that make them so. Eighteen years ago, Local Initiatives Support Corporation, (LISC/Chicago), created The Chicago Neighborhood Development Awards — CNDA — to celebrate the best community development efforts in Chicago’s neighborhoods, and the community and for-profit organizations behind them. Attended by more than 1,400 people, the Awards have become a source of both recognition and inspiration for those committed to community vitality and renewal.

Each year, awardees are selected for five separate community development and three architectural excellence awards, through an extensive juried process that includes architects, funders and community leaders. Eligible nominees include for-profit and non-profit developers and organizations as well as architectural firms, and may be self-nominated or nominated by others. Applications for the five Chicago Neighborhood Development Awards are due by 5PM, Wednesday, September 14, and applications for the three Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Awards for Architectural Excellence in Community Design are due by 5PM, Friday, September 16. Applications are submitted online at www.lisc-cnda.org.

Four Award categories are open to Chicago-area organizations for application:

·         $20,000: The Chicago Community Trust Outstanding Community Initiative Award. Recognizes the development and successful implementation of an initiative that promotes and/or is integral to a comprehensive community development strategy. 

·         $15,000: The Richard H. Driehaus Award for Outstanding Non-Profit Neighborhood Real Estate. Recognizes a community development corporation for a specific real estate project that has contributed significantly to the enhancement of the community.

·         $15,000: The Polk Bros. Foundation Affordable Rental Housing Preservation Award. Recognizes a for-profit developer or a non-profit community development organization for a specific real estate project that has preserved affordable rental housing at risk because of expiring subsidy contracts or physical deterioration. 

·         The Outstanding For-Profit Neighborhood Real Estate Project Award. Recognizes a for-profit developer for a specific real estate project that has contributed significantly to the enhancement of the community.  A monetary award is not made for this recognition.

In addition, applications are being accepted for the Richard H. Driehaus Awards for Architectural Excellence in Community Design. These awards are given to architects who have created outstanding designs in housing, retail or institutional settings that are sustainable, architecturally significant and that match form to function to meet community needs.

First, second and third place awards carry with them monetary awards of $15,000, $3,000 and $2,000 respectively and are juried separately by a panel of architects, funders and community development leaders. Projects must be located in a low- to-moderate-income community or serve a low-to-moderate income population in Cook County, and must have been completed within the last four years.

Finally, nominations are also sought for the Special Recognition Award, given at the discretion of the Awards Committee to an organization that has shown promise as a new or emerging organization, or has achieved a pivotal or innovative community development project, or has been a critical provider of services to the community development field. There is no formal application process for this award. Nominations can be submitted online. The award is $5,000.

Award-winners will be notified in in the late Fall and recognized at the CNDA Awards ceremony on Tuesday, February 28, 2012, at the Hilton Chicago. To apply and for more information on project eligibility and rules, please visit www.lisc-cnda.org.

National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc. holds 88th Anniversary Conclave

Posted by Admin On August - 30 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

 

Nationwide (BlackNews.com) — National President Betty J. Dixon of Shaker Heights, Ohio presided over the 88th Anniversary Biennial Conclave of the National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc. (NSPDK) at the New Orleans Marriott from July 15 through 22, 2011, attended by over 750 members and guests with Alpha Theta Chapter, New Orleans, Louisiana as host. The National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc., an organization dedicated to the highest ideals of the teaching profession, consists of 150 chapters ranging from California to Florida and from Connecticut to Texas.

The association is comprised of college-trained, knowledgeable educators including administrators, classroom teachers, college professors, college presidents, guidance counselors, educational specialists and other educational practitioners, who have made an impact on the educational enterprise in their respective communities. The Conclave theme, “Imagine the Impossibilities: Conceive, Believe, Achieve,” was implemented in an assortment of events designed to educate, challenge, stimulate and inspire participants to strive for excellence in education and to enhance the work of our great sisterhood. Pre-Conclave activities included a community event at Southern University of New Orleans. The Rev. Barbara Gibson of New Orleans was the inspirational guest speaker at the Sunday Worship Service.

On Sunday evening, July 17, the Anthropos, the male affiliate group hosted its inaugural public meeting with Attorney Peter L. Jones of Cleveland, Ohio as the guest speaker. The honorees were award-winning photographer and community activist Lloyd Dennis of New Orleans and Rev. Dwight Webster.

Following the training session for local presidents on Monday morning, the Membership Luncheon took place. New Life Members, sorors with 20 consecutive years of service were recognized. Special tribute was paid to the new Ruby and Diamond Members, who had contributed $750 and $1500, respectively.

An important outreach initiative was the Parade of Books on Monday afternoon, where members from the five regions of the Sorority marched with their 10,000 books to be donated to local schools.

Renowned principal and motivational speaker Shirley Knox Benton of Fort Worth, Texas challenged the audience with her provocative address at the Public Meeting on Monday evening. Juanita Tillman- West, an educator from Pasadena, California received the Sorority’s National Achievement Award for outstanding contributions and service as a member of NSPDK, and Dr. Deborah Voltz, Dean of the School of Education and Director of the Center for Urban Education at the University of Alabama-Birmingham, was the recipient of the National Citation Award, given to an outstanding citizen for extraordinary achievement.

The Grand Opening of the Conclave, a New Orleans Mardi Gras Parade on Tuesday, July 19 was spectacular, resplendent with a band, carnival dancers in gorgeous costumes, stilt walkers and other masked performers. The Zulu Queen was National President Betty J. Dixon, arrayed in a dazzling, multi-colored robe with a half-face feathered mask. National Officers led the parade along with the band and performers.

The Every Member Forum on Wednesday afternoon presented an opportunity for members to discuss cogent educational and societal issues. Among the topics addressed by panelists were: “Parental Involvement-Administrative and Organizational Leadership,” “Top Reasons Why Public Schools Are Not Thriving,” “Lack of Early Intervention,” Instructional Strategies, Politics and Voucher and State Mandates,” “Technology,” “Lack of Motivation,” Outside Influences Invading the School” and “School Resources and Staff.” The panelists were: Sorors Gatsy Moye, Epsilon Theta Chapter; Chaleeta Barnes, Epsilon Alpha Chapter; Kisha Webster, Alpha Mu Chapter; Dr. Shirley Weber, Delta Upsilon Chapter and Dr. Brenda Burrell, Delta Beta Chapter.

Sorors and guests enjoyed a change of pace at fun-filled Gala Night on Wednesday, where groups from each region entertained with song and dance, spotlighting such acts as “The Rockettes”, “Dream Girls”, the “Temptations”, “Soul Train”, “Boots and Spurs”, the “Spinners”, “Smokey Robinson,” “Hollywood” and “Zydeco.”

Dr. Brenda Burrell, National Parliamentarian, presented a thoughtful addressed on “Literacy” at the Vital Issues Breakfast .on Thursday morning. The Conclave Chorus under the direction of Soror Tillie Colter rendered several selections. The Conclave Chorus sang at all major events throughout the conference.

Newly elected officers and board of Trustees members were installed during the Third Plenary Session following the Meditation for Ill and Deceased Sorors. The 2011-2015 officers elected are: Christella Cain, Austin, Texas, First National Vice President; National Corresponding Secretary Yvonne Johnson, Fort Worth, Texas; Donna E. Thompson, University Park, Illinois, National Financial Secretary; Princess Towe, Hillside, New Jersey, National Director of Public Relations; Drusilla Kinzonzi, Monroe, New York, Eastern Regional Director; Yvonne W. Ben, Violet, Louisiana, Southeast Regional Director; Emma Henderson, Westerville, Ohio, Midwest Regional Director; Margarette Gallaway, Dallas, Texas, Southwest Regional Director; Hattie McFrazier, Los Angeles, California, Far West Regional Director and, Peggy Hattiex-Penn, Indianapolis, Indiana, Midwest Region Member-at-Large. Newly installed members of the Board of Trustees are; Ann D. Black, Nashville, TN; Velma Brown, Chino, CA; Dr. Brenda Burrell, Syracuse, UT; Mary E. Ennon, Hackensack, NJ; Sherelene Harris, South Holland, IL and Margaret C. Nelson, Washington, DC.

The Formal Banquet on Thursday evening was the culminating activity of the 88th Anniversary Conclave. Florence O. King, President of the Perpetual Scholarship Foundation, presented a check for $55,000 to support the NSPDK scholarship program. Walter Worthem of Nu Chapter, Birmingham, Alabama was chosen Anthropos of the Year. Rudolph Brown of Chino, California is the newly elected National Anthropos President. Black Cat Productions’ 4 X 4 Band of New Orleans provided incidental music during the banquet and also entertained throughout the evening.

Photocaption: (left to right) Photographer Lloyd Dennis accepting award with presenter Lee Barnes, President of the Eastern Region Anthropos; and Cleveland Call and Post Editor Constance Harper being inducted as an Honorary Member by Betty J. Dixon, National President.

"All God's Children": MLK Commentary

Posted by Admin On August - 30 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

By Dr. Gail C. Christopher, DN
America’s Wire

Washington, DC (BlackNews.com) — In an often expressed dream for a better America, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. called upon Americans to honor “all God’s children” and their rights to equality and justice. His powerful voice and leadership would be welcomed in the turbulent world around us.

Forty-three-years after the March on Washington, Dr. King’s dream of equality for all remains unrealized – the impact of racism persists and children of color still live with the consequences of the racial divide embedded in American society. Our leaders face mounting fiscal challenges, yet we urge the nation not to abandon children in need. As the struggling economy brings fear and despair to families and communities, America must marshal its resources to assure that our children have opportunities to thrive.

There is an intersection between Dr. King’s dream and efforts by government, non-profit advocates and communities working to improve the quality of life for vulnerable children.

Recent census data soundly demonstrates the challenges we face, as a nation, in assuring that future generations can succeed. The poverty rate for children in the U.S. is at 20.7 percent, with 35.7 percent of African-American children living in poverty, 33.1 percent of Hispanic children, 17.7 percent of white children and 14 percent of Asian-American children. Even more disturbing is that those numbers are rapidly increasing. The census also found that 1.4 million children fell into poverty for the first time in 2009.

Efforts to revive the economy will grow even more difficult in the future if the nation doesn’t address child poverty. The Center for American Progress says that in 2007, even before the recession, the economy took a $500 billion hit from child poverty because of increased costs for health care and criminal justice, and decreases in productivity. In fact, economists estimate that child poverty resulted in a 4 percent decrease in the U.S. gross domestic product.

But the statistics don’t tell the entire story. There is an emotional toll on Americans when we recognize that our nation is failing our children. We cannot relegate millions of children to a future without opportunities, a destiny of poverty and social exclusion. That is not the American Dream, and it is an anathema to Dr. King’s dream for our nation.

We must embark on new ways to overcome current child and family poverty statistics and the trajectories they portend. Clearly a shift in federal budget priorities is needed. England has proven that child poverty can be dramatically reduced, if it becomes a national priority. Since 1994, England has cut its child poverty rate by more than 50 percent by establishing public policies such as these: providing tax incentives to single parents for finding jobs, improving public benefits for parents, increasing the minimum wage, allowing parents of young children to request flexible work hours and implementing a comprehensive preschool program. The Center for American Progress says that if $90 billion a year for 10 years is used to fund policies addressing child poverty, the United States can reduce child poverty by 41 percent.

Furthermore, the nation must also address the legacy of the mythology of racism that fueled the nation’s early economic engines, jumpstarting the United States’ meteoric rise to its position as a world power. Racism played a critical role in the development of this country. Its hallmark was systematic dehumanization codified into law for centuries. Related inhumane, destructive and exclusionary practices left indelible impressions in the minds and hearts of people. These impressions or beliefs became feelings and memories (both conscious and unconscious) that have been passed down through generations. Related behaviors are encoded in the patterns of families, communities, ordinances and organizations.

The legacy of our racialized past remains embedded in today’s societal structures, continuing to negatively impact children of color. Persistent residential racial segregation and seemingly intractable disparities in life expectancies, disease burdens, poverty levels, incarceration rates and unemployment levels are symptoms of vestiges of centuries of structural bias in our society, made possible by the mythology of racism.

Dehumanization and denigration or privilege and separation defined the lives of millions of families and their children in America, for most of our existence as a country. Resilience, courage and success against engrained odds are often the untold story for many families of color.

It’s time for America to change.

A true monument to Dr. King would be the birth of a vigorous movement within communities across this nation to heal the divides that we have all inherited through the absurd belief systems of racial hierarchy and privilege based on physical characteristics.

This healing work requires honesty and courageous self-examination but it builds trust and alliances that yield creative solutions to seemingly insolvable problems. Let us honor Dr. King by realizing his dream for a healed America. Let’s do it for our children.

Dr. Christopher is Vice President of Program Strategies for the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, which has launched a $75 million, five year “America Healing” initiative to address structural racism in America. For print or broadcast interviews with Dr. Christopher regarding Dr. King’s legacy and structural bias in America, please contact Michael K. Frisby at mike@frisbyassociates.com or 202-625-4328. America’s Wire is an independent, non-profit news service run by the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education please visit us at www.americaswire.org.

Sec'y of State Jesse White encourages drivers to be safe this Labor Day

Posted by Admin On August - 30 - 2011 ADD COMMENTS

Last Year’s Fatalities Decrease, White Hopes Trend Continues

 

 Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White is encouraging people to be safe and responsible drivers this Labor Day weekend by not drinking and driving. 

“Illinois drivers have made a substantial improvement the past three Labor Day weekends in regards to safe driving,” White said. “Alcohol-related fatalities have decreased by almost 50 percent over that timeframe. My hope is that our drivers continue that trend until there are no deaths on our roads.”

            Illinois Department of Transportation figures show:

  • In 2010, 9 percent of fatal crashes (1 of 11) were alcohol-related on Labor Day weekend.
  • In 2009, 40 percent of fatal crashes (2 of 5) were alcohol-related on Labor Day weekend.
  • In 2008, 58 percent of fatal crashes (7 of 12) were alcohol-related on Labor Day weekend.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, one alcohol-impaired driving fatality occurs every 48 minutes.

 “If you are drinking, stay where you are or designate a sober driver,” White said. “Secretary of State Police will be participating in DUI and seatbelt patrols during the holiday weekend.”

Music Institute of Chicago announces 2011-2012 Concert Series

Posted by Admin On August - 30 - 2011 2 COMMENTS

Paquito D’Rivera, Vamos family, Conrad Tao, CSO Musicians Among Highlights

 
The Music Institute of Chicago (MIC) presents a variety of extraordinary musicians, engaging repertoire, and international perspectives for its 2011–12 concert series at Nichols Concert Hall in Evanston.
 
Highlights include the September 17 opening concert by jazz artist Paquito D’Rivera, Fischoff gold medalists the Calidore String Quartet in October, the multiple talents of the Vamos family in December, and acclaimed musicians of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in May. Noteworthy annual events include the Four Score Festival of contemporary music in March; the Chicago Duo Piano Festival, in its 24th season, in July; Family Concerts in December and March; the second annual Emilio del Rosario Memorial Concert, this year featuring musical prodigy Conrad Tao in May; and the Martin Luther King, Jr. concert with the 100-voice Brotherhood Chorale in January.
 
Saturday, September 17, 7:30 p.m.
Paquito D’Rivera and MIC Jazz Faculty Combo
 
The season opener features Grammy Award-winning jazz multi-instrumentalist and composer Paquito D’Rivera, “the man to call if you want a concert-hall presentation of Pan-Latin music” according to Ben Ratliff of The New York Times, joined by timbalist Juan Picorelli and Music Institute jazz faculty Audrey Morrison, trombone; Pat Mallinger, saxophone; Victor Garcia, trumpet; Jeremy Kahn, piano; Stewart Miller, bass; and Ernie Adams, drums and Latin percussion.
 
Saturday, September 24, 7:30 p.m.                                                                                             James Baur, guitar
Music Institute faculty member James Baur, praised by the Chicago Tribune for his “subtle, detailed precision,” will perform a program of work by Manuel de Falla, Francis Poulenc, Manuel Maria Ponce, and John Baur. A member of the Avanti Duo and MAVerick Ensemble, he recently released his second solo CD.
 
Sunday, October 9, 3 p.m.
 Calidore String Quartet, Fischoff gold medalists
Complementing the Music Institute’s numerous medalists in the junior division of the prestigious chamber music competition, the 2011 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition Grand Prize winners and senior division string gold medalists the Calidore String Quartet, who studied at the Colburn School in Los Angeles, perform Brahms’ Quartet in A Minor, Op. 51, No. 2; Shostakovich’s Quartet No. 3 in F Major, Op. 73; and Wolf’s Italian Serenade in G for String Quartet.
 
Sunday, November 13, 3 p.m.                                                                                             Organ Invitational Recital

Acclaimed organists from Evanston’s houses of worship will perform a concert on the gloriously restored, three manual E.M. Skinner pipe organ at Nichols Concert Hall. The Music Institute is presenting this special concert to raise awareness about the scourge of hunger and food insecurity in our community and will contribute 100 percent of the proceeds to support selected hunger charities in Evanston.

 
Saturday, December 10, 9 a.m. 
Family Concert: Blair Thomas & Company
 
Families begin this morning of music with the Music Institute’s Instrument Petting Zoo, followed by a 10 a.m. performance of A Kite’s Tale, presented by the puppet theatre company Blair Thomas & Company, set to “Pictures at an Exhibition” by Modest Mussorgsky. Admission is only $10 per family.
 
Saturday, December 17, 7:30 p.m.                                                                         Vamos Family Reunion Concert
 
Faculty members Almita Vamos, violin, and Roland Vamos, conductor, perform with their family—Music Institute alumni Simin Ganatra, violin; Nurit Pacht, violin; Brandon Vamos, cello; Rami Vamos, guitar; and Eugenia Monacelli, piano—on a program including Chopin’s Cello Sonata, Poulenc’s Violin Sonata, and Bach’s Concerto for Three Violins.
 
Sunday, January 15, 5 p.m. 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Concert
 
MIC’s annual concert features the Brotherhood Chorale of the Apostolic Church of God. Free admission!
 

Sunday, January 22, 3 p.m.                                                                                              Cantare Chamber Players 

Music Institute faculty members Sang Mee Lee, violin; Clark Carruth, viola; Sophie Webber, cello; John Tuck, bass; and Elaine Felder, piano perform Schubert’s Trout Quintet.

 
Saturday, February 18, 7:30 p.m.
 Cyrus Forough, violin with Tatyana Stepanova, piano
 
Laureate of the Tchaikovsky International Violin Competition and Music Institute artist faculty member Cyrus Forough has performed in recital and with orchestras throughout four continents including command performances for international dignitaries. A prominent representative of the Franco-Belgian school of violin playing, he is a professor at Carnegie Mellon University and a visiting professor at the Eastman School of Music. He will perform a program including Bach’s Chaconne, Beethoven’s Sonata No. 6, and Prokofiev’s Sonata No. 1.
 
Sunday, March 4 and March 11, 3 p.m.
Four Score Festival
 
By incorporating popular forms of American music such as jazz and folk into their compositions, Aaron Copland and Charles Ives created innovative compositions with a sound that became synonymous with the landscape. Four Score Festival 2012 celebrates the music of these 20th century masters and explores how inspiration threaded its way through the works of two of their students, Mario Davidovsky and Gunther Schuller.
March 4: The Music of Charles Ives and Gunther Schuller
March 11: The Music of Aaron Copland and Mario Davidovsky
 
Friday, March 9, 7:30 p.m. 
Generation Next/Composer’s Lab Concert
 
This concert features works by the winners of the Music Institute’s 2012 Generation Next Young Composer’s Competition, which encourages and promotes the development of young composers.
 
Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m.
Family Concert: TBD
 
 
Families begin this morning of music with the Music Institute’s Instrument Petting Zoo, followed by a 10 a.m. performance by an artist to be determined. Admission is only $10 per family.
 
Sunday, March 18, 3 p.m.                                                                                                Meng-Chieh Liu, piano

Music Institute faculty member Meng-Chieh Liu has received the 2002 Avery Fisher Career Grant, the 2002 Philadelphia Musical Fund Society Career Advancement Award, and first prizes in the Stravinsky, Asia Pacific Piano, and Mieczyslaw Munz competitions. He also is on faculty at The Curtis Institute of Music and Roosevelt University. His program includes Schubert’s Sonata D 960 and works by Szymanowski, Brahms, Chopin, and Liebermann.

Sunday, April 29, 3 p.m.
The Lincoln Trio with Roberto Diaz, viola
 
Building on the success of their Carnegie Hall debut and the release of their debut CD Notable Women on Cedille Records, The Lincoln Trio collaborates with internationally renowned violist and Curtis Institute of Music President and CEO Roberto Diaz, returning to the Nichols Concert Hall stage.
 
Saturday, May 5, 7:30 p.m.                                                                                  Quintet Attacca and Axiom Brass

The Music Institute’s award-winning woodwind and brass quintet ensembles-in-residence share a program. 

 
Saturday, May 12, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago Symphony Orchestra Musicians

The Civitas Ensemble—CSO musicians Yuan-Qing Yu, violin; Kozue Funahashi, violin; Catherine Brubaker viola; Kenneth Olsen, cello; J. Lawrie Bloom, clarinet; and Winston Chiu, piano—will perform Beethoven’s Piano Trio No 4, Op. 11; Milhaud’s Clarinet Trio; and Dvorak’s Piano Quintet in A Major, Op. 81.

 
Saturday, May 19, 7:30 p.m. 
Second Annual Emilio del Rosario Memorial Concert: Conrad Tao, piano

A former student of the Music Institute’s late, legendary faculty member Emilio del Rosario, 16-year-old Chinese-American pianist Conrad Tao has been hailed as “the most exciting prodigy to ever come my way” by renowned music critic Harris Goldsmith in Musical America. Tao has appeared as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Russian National Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, and many others, as well as in solo recitals worldwide. 

July 13–22, times TBD                                                                                                       Chicago Duo Piano Festival
Founded by Music Institute faculty members Claire Aebersold and Ralph Neiweem, this annual festival aims, through instruction and public performances, to foster a deeper interest in the repertoire, performance, and teaching of music for piano, four hands and two pianos.

About the Music Institute of Chicago

The Music Institute of Chicago believes that music has the power to sustain and nourish the human spirit; therefore, our mission is to provide the foundation for lifelong engagement with music. As one of the three largest and most respected community music schools in the nation, the Music Institute offers musical excellence built on the strength of our distinguished faculty, commitment to quality, and breadth of programs and services. Founded in 1931 and one of the oldest community music schools in Illinois, the Music Institute is a member of the National Guild of Community Schools of the Arts and accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. Each year, our world-class music teachers and arts therapists provide the highest quality arts education to more than 5,000 students of all ability levels, from birth to 101 years of age at campuses in Evanston, Highland Park, Lake Forest, Lincolnshire, Winnetka, and Downers Grove. The Music Institute also offers lessons and programs at the Steinway of Chicago store in Northbrook and early childhood and community engagement programs throughout the Chicago area and the North Shore. Nichols Concert Hall, our education and performance center located in downtown Evanston, reaches approximately 14,000 people each year. Our community engagement and partnership programs reach an additional 6,500 Chicago Public School students annually. The Music Institute offers lessons, classes, and programs through four distinct areas: Community School, The Academy, Creative Arts Therapy (Institute for Therapy through the Arts), and Nichols Concert Hall.

All concerts take place at Nichols Concert Hall, 1490 Chicago Avenue in Evanston, a venue lauded by John von Rhein of the Chicago Tribune as “a visual and sonic gem.” Tickets are $25 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for students (except where noted), available online or 847.905.1500 ext. 108. All programming is subject to change.

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Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

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