28
April , 2017
Friday

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    Well-known Chicago activist Mike Siviwe Elliott was arrested on board a Metra train for exercising ...
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Preckwinkle applauds actions to create, retain jobs   Cook County commissioners approved proposals by President Preckwinkle’s Bureau ...
After being released theatrically in Los Angeles, California this June, “Addiction”, Perri Pierre’s latest production ...
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(From the Better Business Bureau)     CHICAGO, IL - The Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern ...
   In wake of Blagojevich's trial and pending re-trial, entrepreneur-turned advocate urges Attorney General to "fix" ...
Prayer warriors: ‘Honk if you need prayer’ By Chinta Strausberg More than 200 members and ...
As a part of his Year of Action, the President is using the power ...

Archive for January, 2014

President Obama announces more key administration posts

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

WASHINGTON, DC – President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate the following individuals to key Administration posts:

  • Miranda A. A. Ballentine – Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Installations, Environment, and Logistics, Department of Defense
  • Norman C. Bay – Commissioner, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and upon appointment to be designated Chairman
  • Reggie Brothers – Under Secretary for Science and Technology, Department of Homeland Security
  • William P. Doyle – Commissioner, Federal  Maritime Commission
  • Ann Dunkin – Assistant Administrator for Environmental Information, Environmental Protection Agency
  • Manny Ehrlich – Member, Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board
  • Mileydi Guilarte – United States Alternate Executive Director, Inter-American Development Bank
  • Suzi LeVine – Ambassador to the Swiss Confederation and the Principality of Liechtenstein, Department of State
  • Michael McCord – Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), Department of Defense
  • Brian P. McKeon – Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Department of Defense
  • Christine E. Wormuth – Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Department of Defense

President Obama also announced his intent to appoint the following members to key administration posts:

  • Theodore B. Olson – Member, President’s Commission on White House Fellowships
  • Nathalie Rayes – Member, Board of Trustees of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

President Obama said, “I am honored that these talented individuals have decided to join this Administration and serve our country.  I look forward to working with them in the months and years to come.”

President Obama announced his intent to nominate the following individuals to key Administration posts:

Miranda A. A. Ballentine, Nominee for Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Installations, Environment, and Logistics, Department of Defense

Miranda A. A. Ballentine is the Director of Sustainability, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Facilities, and Stakeholder Engagement for Walmart Stores, Inc., a position she has held since 2008.  Previously, she was Vice President of Investor Analysis, Chief Operating Officer, and Senior Consultant for David Gardiner and Associates from 2003 to 2008.  In 2004, she served as the Director of Operations, Assistant Treasurer, and a Member of the Board of Environment2004.  She was the Operations Director for Solar Electric Light Fund from 2001 to 2004.  Since 2001, she has served as a guest lecturer at Duke University, George Washington University, and Kenan-Flagler School of Business.  She received a B.S. from Colorado State University and an M.B.A from George Washington University.

Norman C. Bay, Nominee for Commissioner, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and upon appointment to be designated Chairman

Norman C. Bay is the Director of the Office of Enforcement at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), a position he has held since 2009.  Prior to this, Mr. Bay was a Professor of Law at the University of New Mexico from 2002 to 2009.  From 2000 to 2001, Mr. Bay was the United States Attorney for the District of New Mexico.  He was an Assistant U.S. Attorney from 1989 to 2000, an Attorney-Adviser at the United States Department of State from 1988 to 1989, and a Law Clerk for the Honorable Otto R. Skopil, Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit from 1986 to 1987.  Mr. Bay received a B.A. from Dartmouth College and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Dr. Reggie Brothers, Nominee for Under Secretary for Science and Technology, Department of Homeland Security

Dr. Reggie Brothers is the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research, a position he has held since 2011.  From 2009 to 2011, Dr. Brothers was a BAE Systems Director for Mission Applications and Technical Fellow.  From 2007 to 2011, he was a BAE Systems Director for Advanced Programs and Technology.  From 2003 to 2007, Dr. Brothers was a Program Manager for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.  From 2001 to 2003, he was a Group Leader for the Charles Draper Laboratory, and from 1999 to 2001 he was Chief Architect for Envoy Networks.  Dr. Brothers was Assistant Group Leader and Member of the Technical Staff at MIT Lincoln Laboratory from 1988 to 1999.  Prior to 1988, Dr. Brothers was a Program Manager, Microwave Design Engineer, and Analog-Digital Design Engineer for Texas Instruments.  Dr. Brothers received a B.S. from Tufts University, an M.S. from Southern Methodist University, and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

William P. Doyle, Nominee for Commissioner, Federal Maritime Commission

William P. Doyle currently serves as a Commissioner on the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC).  Prior to joining the FMC, from 2011 to 2013, Mr. Doyle served as the Chief-of-Staff for the Marine Engineers’ Beneficial Association from 2011 to 2013.  From 2008 to 2011, Mr. Doyle was the Director of Permitting, Scheduling, and Compliance at the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects from 2008 to 2011, and was the Deputy General Counsel and Director of Government and Legislative Affairs for the Marine Engineers’ Beneficial Association from 2002 to 2008.  Mr. Doyle received a B.S. from Massachusetts Maritime Academy and a J.D. from Widener University School of Law.

Ann Dunkin, Nominee for Assistant Administrator for Environmental Information, Environmental Protection Agency

Ann Dunkin is the Chief Technology Officer for the Palo Alto Unified School District, a position she has held since 2012.  Prior to this, Ms. Dunkin was the Director of Technology for the Palo Alto Unified School District from 2009 to 2012.  She held a number of positions at the Hewlett-Packard Company including Senior R&D Program Manager from 2006 to 2008, IT Director and Senior Manager from 2001 to 2005 and IT Operations Director from 1999 to 2001.  Since 2012, she has served on the Consortium on School Networking (CoSN) SmartIT Advisory Board and the CoSN CTO Council since 2013.  Ms. Dunkin received a B.S. in Industrial Engineering and an M.S. from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Manny Ehrlich, Nominee for Member, Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

Manny Ehrlich is the Principal at ESP Consulting, a position he has held since 2002.  Mr. Ehrlich was a Site General Manager for Pitt Penn Corporation from 2007 to 2009.  He served as the General Manager of the Emergency Response Training Center from 2006 to 2007 and was the Vice President of Health, Safety, and Labor Relations at International Specialty Products from 1998 to 2003.  He served as the Director of Emergency Response at BASF Corporation from 1989 to 1998 and the Assistant Plant Manager at BASF’s Geismar Electrolytics Plant from 1980 to 1981. From 1976 to 1980, Mr. Ehrlich was the Assistant Site Manager at Wyndotte Electrolytics under the BASF Corporation.  He received a B.S. from the Drexel Institute of Technology and an Ed.M. and M.A. from Columbia University.

Mileydi Guilarte, Nominee for United States Alternate Executive Director, Inter-American Development Bank

Mileydi Guilarte serves as an International Cooperation Specialist in the Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean at the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), a position she has held since 2011.  From 2010 to 2011, she was the Special Assistant to the Assistant Administrator in the Bureau for Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance at USAID.  Ms. Guilarte held numerous positions at the United Nations from 2007 to 2010, including Special Assistant to the Resident Representative in the Republic of the Maldives and Human Rights Officer on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in East Timor.  From 2004 to 2007, Ms. Guilarte held a number of assignments in the Social Development Department and in the Civil Society Team of the Latin America and the Caribbean Region at the World Bank.  She worked as a contractor for the International Monetary Fund from 2003 to 2004.  Ms. Guilarte received a B.A. from the University of Florida and an M.A. from American University.

Suzi LeVine, Nominee for Ambassador to the Swiss Confederation and the Principality of Liechtenstein, Department of State

Suzi LeVine was Director of Strategic Partnerships for Student Developers and Director of Communications for Education at Microsoft Corporation in Redmond, Washington from 2009 to 2012.  Prior to that, she served as Vice President of Marketing and Sales for Expedia’s luxury travel division from 2003 to 2005 and Director of Marketing at Expedia, Inc. from 1998 to 2002, and Product Manager at Microsoft from 1993 to 1999.  She co-founded and serves as Chair of the Advisory Board for the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle.  She co-founded and served as President of the Kavana Cooperative in Seattle and was a member of the Obama for America National Finance Committee, Co-Chair for Tech for Obama and Women for Obama, and the Northwest Regional Co-Chair.  Ms. LeVine received an A.B. and an Sc.B. from Brown University.

Michael McCord, Nominee for Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), Department of Defense

Michael McCord is the Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), a position he has held since 2009.  From 1987 to 2004, Mr. McCord served in a number of roles in the Senate Armed Service Committee, including as a professional staff member.  As majority staff lead, Mr. McCord served as lead analyst for both the overall defense budget and the Quadrennial Defense Review.  As minority staff lead, Mr. McCord was responsible for oversight of over $100 billion in annual DOD operation maintenance funding and related policy matters.  In 2003, he served as the Budget Analyst for defense and veterans issues for the Committee on the Budget in the U.S. House of Representatives.  From 1985 to 1986, Mr. McCord was an Assistant Analyst in the Budget Analysis Division of the Congressional Budget Office.  He received a B.A. from the Ohio State University and an M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania.

Brian P. McKeon, Nominee for Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Department of Defense

Brian P. McKeon is Deputy Assistant to the President, Executive Secretary of the National Security Council, and Chief of Staff for the National Security Staff at the White House, a position he has held since 2012.  He served as the Deputy National Security Advisor to the Vice President from 2009 to 2012.  Mr. McKeon was on the Presidential Transition’s State Department Agency Review Team, and served as the Deputy Staff Director and Chief Counsel at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 1997 to 2009, serving under then Senator Joe Biden.  Mr. McKeon was previously a law clerk to U.S. District Judge Robert Doumar and also worked on the Clinton-Gore 1996 campaign.  Earlier in his career, Mr. McKeon served in Senator Biden’s personal office in various capacities from 1985 to 1995, including seven years as a Legislative Assistant for Foreign Policy and Defense.  Mr. McKeon received a B.A. from the University of Notre Dame and a J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center.

Christine E. Wormuth, Nominee for Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Department of Defense

Christine E. Wormuth is Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Strategy, Plans, and Forces) at the Department of Defense (DOD), a position she has held since 2012.  Prior to this, she was Special Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs and Senior Director for Defense Policy on the National Security Staff from 2010 to 2012.  Previously, she served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas’ Security Affairs in the Office of the Secretary of Defense from 2009 to 2010.  Before joining the Administration, she was a Senior Fellow in the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies from 2004 to 2009.  Ms. Wormuth was a Principal at DFI Government Services, managing homeland and defense policy contracts for clients from 2002 to 2004.  She served as Country Director for France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg in the Office of European Policy in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy at DOD from 2001 to 2002.  She was the Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy for Programs and Legislation from 2000 to 2001.  Prior to this, she served as Senior Assistant for Strategy Development in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy and Threat Reduction from 1998 to 2000.  She was a Presidential Management Intern in the Office of the Secretary of Defense from 1996 to 1997 and a Senior Research Assistant at the Henry L. Stimson Center in 1995.  Ms. Wormuth received a B.A. from Williams College and a M.P.P. from the School of Public Affairs, University of Maryland.

President Obama announced his intent to appoint the following individuals to key Administration posts:

Theodore B. Olson, Appointee for Member, President’s Commission on White House Fellowships

Theodore B. Olson is a partner at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher’s Washington, D.C. office, a firm he first joined in 1965.  He is Co-Chair of the firm’s Appellate and Constitutional Law Group and its Crisis Management Team.  He is also a member of the firm’s Executive Committee.  Mr. Olson served as Solicitor General of the United States from 2001 to 2004, and was Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice from 1981 to 1984.  He was appointed by President Obama as a Member of the Council of the Administrative Conference of the United States in 2010.  Mr. Olson is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and the Board of Directors of the National Center for State Courts.  In 2010, he was selected by Time as one of the 100 most influential people in the world.  Mr. Olson received a B.A. from the University of the Pacific and a J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Nathalie Rayes, Appointee for Member, Board of Trustees of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Nathalie Rayes is currently the U.S. National Public Relations Director for Azteca America, a Grupo Salinas Company, where she has worked since 2006.  She is also Executive Director of Fundación Azteca America, the company’s philanthropic arm.  Previously, Ms. Rayes served as Deputy Chief of Staff to Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn, and as a Senior Policy Advisor to Los Angeles Councilmember Mike Feuer.  In 1998, she was a Department of State Fellow in the Economic/Political Section of the United States Embassy in Cairo, Egypt.  She serves on the Advisory Board of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute and on the Boards of Directors of the Congressional Hispanic Leadership Institute, Los Angeles Universal Preschool, and the U.S. – Mexico Chamber of Commerce, and is a founding member of the Public Policy Alumni Council at the University of California, Los Angeles.  Ms. Rayes received an A.A. from Santa Monica College, and a B.A. and M.P.P. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Chicagoland adds 54,000 jobs and unemployment rate falls to 8.2 percent

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Cold, Temporary Mining Slowdown Pressures Downstate Rates

Not Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rates


Metropolitan Area

Dec.
2013*

Dec.
2012

Bloomington-Normal

7.1%

6.4%

Champaign-Urbana

8.3%

7.4%

Chicago-Joliet-Naperville

8.2%

8.6%

Danville

12.2%

10.0%

Davenport-Moline-Rock Isl.

6.8%

7.0%

Decatur

12.7%

11.8%

Kankakee-Bradley

11.3%

10.5%

Lake-Kenosha, IL-WI

8.6%

8.5%

Peoria

9.2%

8.2%

Rockford

11.6%

11.0%

Springfield

7.6%

7.3%

St. Louis (IL-Section)

8.5%

8.4%

* Data subject to revision.

CHICAGO, IL – The December unemployment rate in the Chicago‑Joliet‑Naperville Metro Division fell 0.4 to reach 8.2 percent, the lowest rating since December 2008, according to preliminary data released today by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and the Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES). Not seasonally adjusted data compares December 2013 to December 2012.

Illinois businesses added jobs in four metros. Largest increases: Lake-Kenosha (+2.6 percent, +10,100), Chicago-Joliet-Naperville (+1.4 percent, +54,400), Springfield (+0.7 percent, +800). Largest decreases: Decatur (-1.9 percent, -1,000), Bloomington-Normal (-1.5 percent, ‑1,400) and Champaign-Urbana (-1.0 percent, -1,100). Much of these decreases continue to reflect a temporary slowdown in global manufacturing demand. Industry sectors recording job growth in the most metros: Education and Health Services (eight of 12), Retail Trade (eight of 12), and Leisure and Hospitality (seven of 12).

Not seasonally adjusted data compares the current month to the same month of the previous year. The December 2013 not seasonally adjusted Illinois rate was 8.6 percent and 12.2 percent at its peak in this economic cycle in January 2010. Nationally, the unemployment rate was 6.5 percent in December and 10.6 percent in January 2010 at its peak. The unemployment rate identifies those who are out of work and looking for work and is not tied to collecting unemployment insurance benefits. Historically, the state unemployment rate is higher than the national rate.

Total Non-farm Jobs (Not Seasonally Adjusted) – December 2013

Metropolitan Area

December
2013*

December
2012**

Over-the-Year Change

Bloomington-Normal MSA

90,600

92,000

-1,400

Champaign-Urbana MSA

106,800

107,900

-1,100

Chicago-Joliet-Naperville Metro Div.

3,811,500

3,757,100

54,400

Danville MSA

29,700

29,800

-100

Davenport-Moline-Rock Island MSA

184,500

183,400

1,100

Decatur MSA

50,700

51,700

-1,000

Kankakee-Bradley MSA

44,400

44,600

-200

Lake County-Kenosha County Metro Div.

395,400

385,300

10,100

Peoria MSA

183,200

184,500

-1,300

Rockford MSA

150,200

150,500

-300

Springfield MSA

112,800

112,000

800

Illinois Section of St. Louis MSA

229,300

229,600

-300

*Preliminary **Revised

Unanimous Supreme Court applies Rule of Lenity; Reverses a 20-Year Mandatory Sentencing Enhancement for Sale of One Gram of Heroin

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

(From the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL)

On January 27, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court issued an important criminal law ruling in the case of Burrage v. United States by applying the rule of lenity – a rule of statutory construction that resolves ambiguities in the language of a law in favor of the defendant. Reversing the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, the Court held that to apply the 20-year minimum sentencing enhancement in §841(b)(1)(C) to someone convicted of selling certain substances to a user who then dies, “at least where use of the drug distributed by the defendant is not an independently sufficient cause of the victim’s death or serious bodily injury[,]” the government must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that “but for” the use of that particular substance, the user of the drug would be alive.

In this case, Mr. Burrage had sold one gram of heroin to someone who, according to toxicology reports introduced at trial, had a cocktail of multiple drugs in his system. The government had secured the now-reversed sentencing enhancement in the lower court through argument and a jury instruction that it is enough under the statute – the plain language of which requires that the “death … result[ed] from the use of such substance” — to prove that the substance sold by the defendant was a “contributing cause” of the user’s death. The Supreme Court unanimously disagreed.

A copy of the Court’s decision in Burrage v. United States is available here. The amicus brief NACDL filed in support of Mr. Burrage is available here.

Racial differences in New York City’s murder clearance rates

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

The Sentencing Project – Race and Justice News

A New York Daily News investigation of New York City’s murder clearance rates ­­­­– the number of arrests made in homicide cases as a proportion of reported homicides over a 12-month period – found significant disparities by race and precinct. The paper’s review of murder investigations in 2013 revealed that 86% of homicides involving a white victim were solved in comparison to 45% of those involving a black victim and 56% involving a Hispanic victim. This is caused partly by precinct-level variation in detective staffing: precincts with larger white and wealthy populations had a higher detective to case ratio. For example, “Manhattan South’s homicide squad has 10 detectives to assist precincts in murder investigations … despite only 10 murders in its jurisdiction in 2013 ­­­­– one case per detective. Brooklyn North’s homicide squad has 17 detectives, despite a whopping 86 homicides in its jurisdiction ­­­­– five cases per detective.” While some experts also attribute lower clearance rates to the reluctance in some communities to cooperate with police investigations, victims’ families point to police shortcomings that suggest a lower level of official concern about African American deaths. The paper’s investigation also revealed an overall decline in murder clearance rates since the 1990s, accompanied by a decline in the number of detectives during the same time period.

IDOT winter crews prepare for snow, high winds this weekend

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Motorists should beware of blowing and drifting snow, black ice


CHICAGO, IL – The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) announced today that road conditions in Chicago and other areas of the state are expected to change with the anticipated snow and high winds this weekend.

IDOT has winter weather crews across the state on standby and motorists should beware of slick and hazardous driving conditions in some areas across the state.

“As this next weather system moves through Illinois, motorists are reminded to use extreme caution when on the roads,” said Illinois Transportation Secretary Ann L. Schneider. “With the high winds expected, blowing and drifting snow will impact visibility, so motorists are encouraged to take it slow, give plow drivers plenty of room, buckle up and avoid distractions.”

Motorists are also reminded of the “Move Over” law. The law, enacted in 2002 and also known as Scott’s Law, requires motorists to slow down and, if possible, change lanes when approaching police, emergency or construction vehicles displaying flashing warning lights.

Please remember to drive safe and pay attention to what is going on around you when driving. Avoid distractions that may lead to crashes and traffic violations. Move over as indicated and proceed with caution around emergency vehicles and in work zones.

Drivers are reminded to exercise caution when snow and ice affect roadways, and IDOT advises travel only when absolutely necessary during winter storms or when temperatures are extremely low. During the severely cold weather expected, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security advises that Illinois residents limit exposure to cold temperatures, dress in layers, check in on others who may need additional assistance, keep vehicles in good repair, and bring pets indoors.

For those traveling, check www.gettingaroundillinois.com for the latest winter road conditions and road closures.

Safety tips to remember:

• Allow extra time for travel during the winter months.
• Don’t crowd the plow – a snow plow operator’s field of vision is restricted. You may see them, but they may not see you.
• Be aware that black ice can form on roads that appear clear and the unseen ice can be treacherous. Take it slow when approaching intersections, off-ramps, bridges and shady areas – all are prone to black ice, which is often invisible.
• Always keep your gas tank at least two-thirds full to help prevent the vehicle’s fuel line from
freezing.
• Do not travel during bad weather unless absolutely necessary – if you do have to make a trip, check the forecast and make sure someone is aware of your travel route and schedule.
• Always carry an emergency car care kit that contains jumper cables, flares or reflectors,
windshield washer fluid, a small ice scraper, traction material, blankets, non-perishable food and
a first aid kit.
• Carry a few extra blankets in your car, and perhaps an extra coat to ensure protection in case of a breakdown.
• Carry a cell phone and dial *999 for roadway assistance in case of emergency (but remember using handheld phones while driving is illegal if it is not an emergency situation).
• Always wear a seat belt, front seat or back – it’s the law.
• Check travel and road conditions routinely before any trip. You can get road condition information by calling 1-800-452-IDOT (4368), Illinois Tollway information by calling 1-800-TOLL-FYI or online at www.gettingaroundillinois.com and click on the “winter road conditions” icon.

Health Care Workforce Report Released

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Recommendations to increase the number of health care providers to meet demand due to Affordable Care Act implementation


SPRINGFIELD, IL – The Illinois Health Care Reform Implementation Council Workforce Workgroup recently released its report with recommendations on how to increase the number of providers in Illinois available to provide health care to more consumers generated by the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

“Illinois is already experiencing workforce shortages with many safety net and rural health providers being challenged to deliver adequate care for those in their communities,” Illinois Department of Public Health Director Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck said.  “If not adequately addressed, workforce shortages ranging from primary care physicians to dental hygienists to nurses could undermine the ability of these newly insured residents, and even the currently insured, to access services and quality care. This report from the workforce workgroup will help us navigate these challenges and help ensure the health of all Illinoisans.”

The workforce workgroup, led by Dr. Hasbrouck,  includes eight additional state agencies with participation from external stakeholders.  The  workgroup was charged with:

• Assessing the current health care workforce landscape;
• Developing gap analysis to identify both current needs and impending workforce needs;
• Developing strategies to address workforce gaps;
• Coordinating broader statewide engagement on career pathways analysis, health care workforce training investments, and recruitment/retention;
• Developing a report and recommendations for the Health Care Reform Implementation Council;
• Leading development of draft legislation that may be needed to implement workgroup recommendations to successfully implement health care reform.

In its report, the workgroup offers 23 recommendations, which address areas such as scopes
of practice for health care providers; expanding opportunities for health professionals to provide
care across state lines; streamlining the licensing/credentialing process for Veterans; developing course curricula that can bridge the gap between military training and requirements to practice in Illinois; establishing the definition and utilization of community health workers; increasing funding for medical school scholarships and loan repayment; and standardizing and expanding health care curricula development, training, recruitment and retention.

The workgroup report and recommendations will serve as a foundational document for directing longer term comprehensive strategies for creating health care jobs needed to care for the growing, diverse and aging population.  Workgroup members with continue to work with the Health Care Reform Implementation Council and the Illinois Workforce Investment Board Health Care Task Force in following through on these recommendations.  The report and recommendations from the Workforce Workgroup is available at http://www2.illinois.gov/gov/healthcarereform/Pages/Workforce.aspx.

Just as the workforce workgroup report is a guide to aid in full implementation of the ACA by addressing the need for health care providers, the Illinois Department of Public Health Five Year Strategy 2014-2018 is a roadmap to better serve the citizens of Illinois by addressing the priorities of building partnerships; improving data quality, utilization and dissemination; reducing health disparities; speaking as Illinois’ public health authority; and increasing
regulatory compliance.  For a copy of the strategic plan, visit,
http://www.idph.state.il.us/about/StrategicPlan_Final_2014-2018.pdf

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10 Great Myths of American History dismantled

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

What America Does Not Want Its Citizens To Know About Its History

Nationwide (BlackNews.com) — Is Ancient America nothing more than the missing pages of Black history? Perhaps so! New documented insights are being brought forward by Dr. David Imhotep Ph.D., former nutritionist of Muhammad Ali, and author of The First Americans Were Africans: Documented Evidence. He is quickly changing the ancient imagined faces of America and replacing them with astounding myth busting evidence of who the first Americans really were. On the eve of Black history month we thought it fitting to recalibrate Black history not as a tragic side note of American history but the very foundation of America and its rise as a global power.

Here are ten well assumed American myths dismantled by his profound research:

1. 1. The first Americans were Indians – Ok, this is the one everyone knows to be true right? Dr. Imhotep’s book gives detailed evidence about this fact. He says there are tens thousands of years of African travels to the Americas before the Indians arrived.

2.  Columbus discovered America – This is a very old argument that most people have given up on. Columbus’s journeys were noteworthy for a number of reasons but “discovery” should not be attached to any of them.

3.  Whites were the first to conduct international trade – This is very hard for most modern Americans to imagine international trade without White Americans involved, but it existed for thousands of years before they were in existence. The Pier and Harbor at Bimini, Bahamas substantiates this.

4. The mound builders were Native Americans – Some American mounds are clearly the work of master builders, but they were not Indians. This is one fact the Smithsonian does not advertise.

5. Vikings discovered America – We already destroyed this one, but to make it clear: the first European people in America were not the first to discover it. They were among the last to discover the New World behind the Africans and Asians.

6.  Pilgrims were the first farmers in America – Was it not the Native Americans who saved the Pilgrims from starving their first winter with the crops they grew?

7.   White people built the first roads and canals in America – Roads and canals were built by Africans far before Europeans came. Some can still be seen in southwestern USA.

8.   The first Eskimos were Asians – Oh…come on Dr. Imhotep, you’ve got to be kidding me–is what you are probably thinking about this one right? The answer… two words: documented evidence! Documentation trumps conversation, and the evidence clearly shows the original Eskimo’s really were not from Asia.

9. The first Black Africans were brought to America during the Slave Trade – In the Americas; this is a standard and tragic myth because it turns out that the ancestors of many of the people brought here during slavery were already well established in the travels to America for tens of thousands of years.

10.  European White people were the first iron makers in the Americas – When it comes to European Americans, in American history, we love to give credit where it just isn’t due. Africans were the first iron makers in the Americas and early Europe many years before White folks ever arrived.


These claims are easily substantiated with evidence in every case. In short, Dr. Imhotep has laid out the blueprint for correcting American History and every American should be willing to learn about their first founding fathers. This is the foundation of the America we know and love and everyone should be proud of our collective African heritage. It’s also a part of what makes us great! So this Black History Month we should also celebrate the contributions of the great “African American” founders who made it possible for others to walk in their shadows even while they were being written out of history. In short, we should celebrate Black history every day because without Black history there is really no American history, it’s really that simple!

Dr. David Imhotep is America’s First PhD in Ancient African History and author of the book “Africans Were The First Americans: Documented Evidence”. For more information or to schedule him for an interview, please contact Marcus Malcolm at (302) 536-9642 or info@bettermarketingmastery.com

Photo Caption: Dr. David Imhotep Ph.D., author of The First Americans Were Africans: Documented Evidence.

Funeral Services to be held Saturday for wife of Rev. C.E. Robinson

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 1 COMMENT

By Chinta Strausberg

Funeral services for Margaret Robinson, the wife of Rev. Charles E. Robinson, will be held 10 a.m. Saturday, February 1, 2014, at the Starlight MBC, 3506 West Cermak Road, where he is pastor and she had been the church’s First Lady.

Mrs. Robinson, 65, passed last Tuesday at Rush Presbyterian Hospital after a long illness, according to her husband who said she had been on dialysis for a couple of years

Born on February 4, 1948 in Duncan, Mississippi to a family of 16, Robinson came to Chicago in 1965 where she met Rev. Robinson while working in a processing plant in DesPlaines. “We fell in love at work,” said Rev. Robinson who married his true love on April 19, 1986 in Chicago.

A mother of four, Mrs. Robinson was a housewife and soul mate to her beloved husband.

“Condolences go out to Rev. Robinson and his family on behalf of Interfaith Illinois,” said Chuck Bowen, administrative assistant to Bishop Dr. Claude Porter, chairman of Interfaith Illinois. “She will be greatly missed,” said Bowen.

Mrs. Robinson leaves to mourn: four daughters, Lorraine, Vanessa, Yvette Robinson, Charlie Ashley, seven sisters, Ernestine, Leola, Thelma, Mary, Gloria, Barbara, Azzie, one brother, Charlie.

Burial will be held at the Forest Homes Cemetery, Forest Park, Illinois.

Chinta Strausberg is a Journalist of more than 33-years, a former political reporter and a current PCC Network talk show host. You can e-mail Strausberg at: Chintabernie@aol.com.

“Don’t think all ecstasies are the same” – Rumi

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Written by Sheri Winkelmann
Directed by Helen Young

When Sadia travels to India to volunteer with the exiled Tibetan refugee community, she never imagines that she would meet the love of her life. Caught in a whirlwind romance, her new love moves to America and they quickly marry.  Not long after the wedding, Sadia discovers a dark, twisted side to him that eventually threatens her life. Struggling to escape the physical and psychological violence that has become her daily life, she discovers the enlightened Sufi poet Rumi, whose spiritual insights guide her to freedom.

STAGED READING SCHEDULE
Friday, February 7th at 8pm
Saturday, February 8th at 4pm
Sunday, February 9th at 4pm

Each performance is followed by a talk-back with the playwright.

TICKETS
Tickets are $10 and can be purchased by clicking HERE.

To be assured seating, please purchase tickets today. There is no processing fee to buy online.

VENUE
All performances held at Silk Road Rising’s home:
The Historic Chicago Temple Building, 77 W Washington St, Chicago.

TRANSPORTATION
Silk Road Rising is easily accessible by public transportation.

We also offer $8 discounted parking at Self Park, 230 W Washington St (corner of Washington  & Franklin, building with Cosi, 3 blocks west of the theatre).  Ask box office for a discount voucher.

ILAACP will present 2nd Black History Month Directory

Posted by Admin On January - 31 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

The Illinois African American Coalition for Prevention (ILAACP) will celebrate Black History Month in February, and will post a variety of events that they believe will help inform and enlighten in a continued quest for knowledge to ensure safe, healthy, and resilient African American children, families, and communities.

The ILAACP will present its 2nd Annual Black History Month Directory, a directory of events celebrating Black History Month. The directory consists of three sections: Arts, Culture & Entertainment, Family & Youth Activities, and Professional & Educational Events.

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Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

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