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Archive for October, 2009

Once jailed Civil Rights minister joins the PCC Broadcast Network

Posted by Juanita Bratcher On October - 26 - 2009 ADD COMMENTS

Rev. Lottie Woods Hall, pastor of The Intercessory Center and host of “The Joy Factor”, aired on radio station WPJM 800 AM in Greenville, South Carolina, will bring her ministry to the PCC Broadcast Network.

Hall, in earlier years, was a part of the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham, Alabama, “Where many young men and women shed blood for the freedom we now appreciate,” said PCC in a press statement. “She was caring, willing to go against the odds for freedom and went to jail for our civil rights. And today, she offers no apologies.”

Hall comes from a family of ministers and fighters who fought alongside Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Rev. Hall now joins the Probation Challenge Broadcast Network with her ministry, “The Intercessory Center,” noted PCC. “She is dedicated to standing in the gap for those in need of prayer and spiritual assistance.

“We invite you to listen, view and support the ministries of those who labor among us in an effort to set the captives free,” PCC further stated.

International PCC Internet Network Broadcasts can be seen and heard at WWW.probationchallenge,org.

Rev. Hall’s “The Joy Factor”, is aired Thurdays at 12 noon on WPJM 800AM in Greenville, S.C., and comments can be mailed to The Intercessory Center, 1298 Pendleton St., Greenville, S.C. 29611. She can also be reached at 1 (864) 295-4470.

 

DAVIS LECTURE TO ADDRESS ROLE OF BLACK CHURCH IN AMERICAN POLITICS

Posted by Juanita Bratcher On October - 23 - 2009 ADD COMMENTS

Historian Barbara Savage, author of “Your Spirits Walk Beside Us,” to deliver annual lecture

EVANSTON, Ill. — Historian Barbara D. Savage — whose most recent book challenges the assumption that black churches and black progressive politics in America are inextricably and easily intertwined — will deliver the Allison Davis Lecture Thursday, Oct. 29, at Northwestern University.

Savage, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, will speak on “The Politics of Black Religion” at 4:30 p.m. at McCormick Tribune Center Forum, 1870 Campus Drive, Evanston campus. Her presentation is free and open to the public.

Savage’s 2008 book, “Your Spirits Walk Beside Us: The Politics of Black Religion” (Harvard University Press), is an historical examination of the debates about the public responsibility of black churches and the role of religion in racial leadership. In it, she describes a highly diversified religious community that maintained an uneasy and often contentious relationship with political activists that championed black causes.

Savage also is the author of “Broadcasting Freedom: Radio, War, and the Politics of Race, 1938-1948” (University of North Carolina Press, 1999), winner of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library Award for best book in American history in the 1916 to 1966 period.

In addition, Savage is co-editor of “Women and Religion in the African Diaspora” (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), a collection of new work from scholars associated with a three-year Ford funded project coordinated with Professor R. Marie Griffith at Princeton University.

Presented yearly by Northwestern’s African American Studies department, the Allison Davis Lecture honors Davis, who in 1949 became the first black academic to receive tenure at a major university. Past Allison Davis speakers have included William Julius Wilson, Mary Frances Berry, Patricia Williams, Johnnetta Cole and Michael Eric Dyson.

For further information, call (847) 467-3005 or e-mail e-ure@northwestern.edu.

NORTHWESTERN NEWS: www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/

NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS GROUP TO HONOR GRASSROOTS ACTIVISTS COMMITTED TO RACIAL JUSTICE

Posted by Juanita Bratcher On October - 22 - 2009 ADD COMMENTS

Advancement Project Celebrates 10 Years of Creating Change and Delivering Impact

Sweet Honey in the Rock

Washington, DC (BlackNews.com) – Advancement Project, a civil justice action tank, will honor five exemplary individuals and organizations that have contributed to a collective national voice for racial equity. Its 10th anniversary gala on October 29 will feature Sweet Honey in the Rock and Raddy’s New Orleans Second Line Band in a festive tribute to the inspiring work of the thousands of volunteers who have worked together to ensure a better life for those who are often underrepresented.

Over the last 10 years, Advancement Project has acted as a bridge to power, providing grassroots organizations across the country with the tools they need to make positive changes to their own communities. Advancement Project is working with New Orleans residents to regain access to their homes, which were destroyed by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) after Hurricane Katrina. It has partnered with organizations from Denver to Miami to improve school discipline codes in an effort to end the schoolhouse to jailhouse track. And, it is helping thousands of individuals from Ohio to Missouri to Virginia exercise their right to vote.

“From New Orleans, to Mississippi, to Virginia to Florida, Advancement Project has been on the front lines, fighting tirelessly against racial injustice for the last 10 years,” Judith A. Browne-Dianis, Co-founder and Co-Director of Advancement Project said. “Advancement Project seeks to provide organizations with the research tools, insight, legal analysis, and communication strategies to help them gain make an impact in their community from access to decent housing, an equitable education, economic justice and the ballot box.”

Held at the Mayflower Hotel, Advancement Project will honor many of the individuals who have aided in its efforts to create a more just democracy at their gala. They include:

* Gloria Williams and Bobbie Jennings, Odessa Lewis, and Stephanie Mingo: These two sets of 60-year-old twin sisters are fighting for the rights to return to their homes, alongside over 4,000 families whose public housing units were demolished by HUD after Hurricane Katrina, even though it would have cost less to repair the buildings than to demolish and rebuild.

* Bob Herbert: The New York Times writer’s 1999 column on a real estate developer’s plan to build a state-of-the art $8-million school in Tunica, Mississippi, that would serve mostly white families in an upscale community helped mobilize Congress, the U.S. Justice Department and other civil rights groups to the disparity. In the end, a school was built closer to an African-American community, so that it could serve all students in the area.

* Padres y Jovenes Unidos: This Denver-based organization works for equality and justice in education, racial justice for youth, immigrant rights and the right to quality healthcare for all. In 2008, Advancement Project and Padres y Jovenes Unido achieved a major milestone when the Denver school board approved a new discipline code that both groups drafted. Rewriting the discipline code was part of a six-year effort to end the schoolhouse-to-jailhouse track in Denver, which was pushing students–disproportionately Black and Latino–out of the public school system and into the juvenile justice system.

* Jenner & Block LLP: This Chicago-based law firm donated considerable time and resources, partnering with Advancement Project to protect the rights of thousands of displaced New Orleans public housing residents after HUD closed affordable housing. In the wake of a dire housing shortage, Advancement Project, Jenner & Block, LLP and attorneys Bill Quigley and Tracie Washington sued HUD to immediately re-open safe and habitable public housing in New Orleans.

* Open Society Institute: The New York-based organization founded by billionaire philanthropist George Soros has been a generous and staunch supporter of a variety of Advancement Project’s programs including its Voter Protection Program and work in New Orleans post-Katrina. Their support has made it possible for Advancement Project to give voice to hundreds of thousands who struggle for racial justice and equality.

“We are thrilled to honor such inspiring individuals and organizations, who have forged new paths in the fight for racial justice. Their resilience, determination and refusal to remain defeated have helped countless individuals across the country achieve victory in hard-fought struggles for a more just democracy,” Penda D. Hair, Co-Founder and Co-Director of Advancement Project said.

The multicultural celebration of the diverse groups Advancement Project has championed in the past decade, will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will include dinner and dancing. Tickets are $250/person and $2,500/table. Proceeds will benefit the nonprofit organization’s ongoing programs. Those interested in purchasing tickets should call 202-728-9557 or visit www.advancementproject.org

A reborn American Blues Theater announces its 2009-2010 season

Posted by Juanita Bratcher On October - 21 - 2009 ADD COMMENTS

American Blues Theater, Chicago’s second oldest equity ensemble company, announced its 2009-2010 season. The award-winning ensemble-based company will open its 24th season under its original name with a symbolic return to its first artistic home, Victory Gardens Theater, for “It’s Wonderful Life: Live at the Biograph!”

Marty Higginbotham returns to direct a new adaptation of the classic story based on the Frank Capra masterpiece and performed as a period radio piece. It runs November 27-December 27 in the new Studio at Victory Gardens Theater at the Biograph, 2433 N. Lincoln Ave., Chicago.

Other shows in the season include Jack Kirkland’s 1933 classic “Tobacco Road” (May-June 2010) and “Ripped: The Living Newspaper Project” (Fall 2010), a new project by ABT founding ensemble member Rick Cleveland, fellow ensemble members Tania Richard and Gwendolyn Whiteside and a wealth other writers, musicians, dancers, singers, actors and directors from Chicago and across the country.

For more information, visit americanbluestheater.com.

 

President Barack Obama wins Nobel Peace Prize

Posted by Juanita Bratcher On October - 12 - 2009 ADD COMMENTS

 

Nobel Committee: President Obama “captured” the world’s attention

By Juanita Bratcher

It wasn’t the 3 a.m. controversial call discussed during the presidential campaign that made its way into the White House and caused a stir. It was a 5:45 a.m. call to White House Deputy Press Secretary Bill Burton informing him that President Barack Obama had won the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize.

The news of Obama winning the prestigious Prize spread like wildfire. Response was quick and swift – from supporters and detractors alike.

Shocked, surprised, undeserved, embarrassing, premature, a liability, they responded. Some cautioned that the prestigious award had the possibility of being an albatross around the president’s neck. And some had the unmitigated gall to say that the president should decline his award.

So much for a descriptive play on words.

There were others who questioned the timing of the nomination – stating that President Obama had only been in office 12 days before the February 1, 2009 deadline for nominations. The president took the Oath of Office on January 20, 2009.

The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the most prestigious awards and honor to be bestowed upon any given recipient. And by all accounts, the president was not even aware that he was a nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize, and certainly he didn’t vote for himself. That decision was made by the five-member Nobel Committee, consisting of four females and one male.

 

   “Only very rarely has a person to the same

     extent as (President) Obama captured the

     world’s attention and given its people hope

      for a better future”  – Nobel Committee

 

Thorbjorn Jagland, Chairman of the Nobel Committee, said it was a unanimous decision by the Committee to award the Nobel Peace Prize to President Obama.

When making the announcement, Jagland said the Committee “attached special importance to Obama’s vision of and work for a world without nuclear weapons.”

He said as president, “Obama has created a new climate in international politics. Multilateral diplomacy has regained a central position, with emphasis on the role that the United Nations and other international institutions can play.”

Further, Obama was honored for his “extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples,” and that the president was not recognized prematurely for his efforts.

“His diplomacy is founded in the concept that those who are to lead the world must do so on the basis of values and attitudes that are shared by the majority of the world’s population,” the Committee said of Obama.

Being a recipient of the award was just as surprising to the president as with others. Obama acknowledged that he was “surprised and deeply humbled by the decision of the Nobel Committee. Let me be clear: I do not view it as a recognition of my own accomplishments, but rather as an affirmation of American leadership on behalf of aspirations held by people in all nations.”

(See President Obama’s full comments below)

But amongst all the praise and criticism, Obama said the prize is a “call to action.”

Obama is the fourth U.S. President to win the prestigious prize and the third sitting president to do so. Other presidents receiving the award were Theodore Roosevelt in 1916; Woodrow Wilson in 1919; and Jimmy Carter (out of office) in 2002.

The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded 89 times to 119 Nobel Laureates between 1901 and 2008 – 96 times to individuals and 23 times to organizations.

While many of Obama’s supporters welcomed the news – certainly, some with a bit of apprehension – there was a long line of Obama detractors who went negative and trashed the good news altogether.

The “verbal lynching mob” (they know who they are) voiced strong opposition to, and questioned Obama being a recipient of the Prize – the same people who sit on the sidelines and criticize for the sake of criticizing, hoping for his administration’s failure. If America fails, doesn’t that affect all Americans?

These are some of the same people who cheered when Chicago lost its bid to bring the 2016 Olympics to Chicago; the Birthers, the gun-toters at health care reform town hall meetings, and Tea Party demonstrators.

And many of those strident voices have the unmitigated gall to say that the president should decline the Nobel Peace Prize because he hasn’t done that much in the way of accomplishments to deserve it; that in essence, it’s a joke.

Criticism of Obama getting the award was blunt and hard-hitting by many of those strident voices that are part of an outright “verbal lynching mob” which came full circle during candidate Barack Obama’s presidential campaign and have pretty much lingered on in the aftermath of Obama taking the Oath of Office as America’s 44th president.

And  even though efforts to bring the Olympics to Chicago was initiated by Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, some wanted to make Obama the loser after Chicago lost in the first round and Rio de janeiro ended up getting the coveted prize to host the 2016 Olympics. In the first place, it was Daley’s project from the start. It was never Obama’s project. He only went to Copenhagen after being asked to by the Chicago 2016 Olympic Committee, to give support to Daley’s and the Committee’s efforts, and as President of the United States.

Certainly, Daley should be applauded for his efforts. He and the 2016 Committee showed courage and statesmanship in their efforts to bring the 2016 Olympics to Chicago. That’s what leadership is about – to walk up to the plate and be a leader. Daley did that. But President Obama should not have been looked upon as the one that couldn’t make it happen.

Obama’s response to winning Nobel Peace Prize

I am both surprised and deeply humbled by the decision of the Nobel Committee. Let me be clear: I do not view it as a recognition of my own accomplishments, but rather as an affirmation of American leadership on behalf of aspirations held by people in all nations.

To be honest, I do not feel that I deserve to be in the company of so many of the transformative figures who’ve been honored by this prize — men and women who’ve inspired me and inspired the entire world through their courageous pursuit of peace.

But I also know that this prize reflects the kind of world that those men and women, and all Americans, want to build — a world that gives life to the promise of our founding documents. And I know that throughout history, the Nobel Peace Prize has not just been used to honor specific achievement; it’s also been used as a means to give momentum to a set of causes. And that is why I will accept this award as a call to action — a call for all nations to confront the common challenges of the 21st century.

President Barack Obama wins Nobel Peace Prize

Posted by Juanita Bratcher On October - 11 - 2009 ADD COMMENTS

 

Obama’s response to winning Nobel Peace Prize

I am both surprised and deeply humbled by the decision of the Nobel Committee. Let me be clear: I do not view it as a recognition of my own accomplishments, but rather as an affirmation of American leadership on behalf of aspirations held by people in all nations.

To be honest, I do not feel that I deserve to be in the company of so many of the transformative figures who’ve been honored by this prize — men and women who’ve inspired me and inspired the entire world through their courageous pursuit of peace.

But I also know that this prize reflects the kind of world that those men and women, and all Americans, want to build — a world that gives life to the promise of our founding documents. And I know that throughout history, the Nobel Peace Prize has not just been used to honor specific achievement; it’s also been used as a means to give momentum to a set of causes. And that is why I will accept this award as a call to action — a call for all nations to confront the common challenges of the 21st century.

Solving young black males’ problems in school

Posted by Juanita Bratcher On October - 3 - 2009 ADD COMMENTS

Solving young black males’ problems in school


Reggie Jenkins, author and UUNIK Academy Executive Director

Knoxville, TN (BlackNews.com) – Across the country, black boys are in trouble. Most parents and educators view the situation of black boys alerting. Two community leaders share solutions in their new book to local communities.

The plight of black males in America is troubling. Nationally, young black males account for 56% of juvenile drug offenders in residential placement. In fact, black males lead about every negative performance indicator, such school drop out and unemployment rates in the nation.

Deossie Dingus, former Tennessee Highway Patrol Officer, explains, “We own those indicators. The CDC [Center for Disease and Control] now has the tasks of tracking the death rate of Black males in America.” Dingus maintains that the death rates of young black males are so troubling that it can be classified as an epidemic.

A Call to Destiny: How to Create Effective Ways to Assist Black Boys in America by Dr. Daryl D. Green and Reggie Jenkins provides a practical assessment of what happens to young black boys in America. They authors hope to share their critical solutions to others. Jenkins argues, “With unemployment, racism, drug use, illiteracy, dysfunctional family structure, lack of positive role models, and prison incarceration on the rise, there is a dire need for workshops and conferences that address the issues confronting our male youth.”

The new book seeks to provide ways for parents, educators, and supporters to assist these boys in their positive development. Without any intervention, young black boys, regardless of their social class, will not survive in the 21st century. Dr. Green notes, “There is plenty of blame to go around. It is time for adults to stop talking and act. We are offering proven solutions, not untested ones.” In the book, there are over 70 strategies to assist young males toward more productive lives. Proceeds from the e-book version will be donated to UUNIK Academy to better assist these young boys.

Both authors are community-focused and results-oriented. Dr. Green is a nationally recognized lecturer and author of several books. Dr. Green is a professor at Knoxville College. Mr. Jenkins is the founder and executive director of UUNIK Academy, a rites of passage program dedicated to holistic development of young males between the ages of 10-15. Mr. Jenkins is also a graduate of University of Tennessee (Knoxville) where he earned a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and a minor in Statistics.

The authors are available for media interviews as well as speaking engagements to businesses, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, and local communities. For more information, please contact Reggie Jenkins at regkam2@gmail.com.

About UUNIK Academy, Inc.:
UUNIK Academy, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to the holistic development of African-American males between the ages of 11-15. For more information, go to UUNIK Academy’s website at Website: www.uunik-academy.org, www.myspace.com/uunik

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Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

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