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  “Beyond The Boardroom”, the long awaited biography of former Cook County Board President John Herman ...
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Archive for the ‘Labor’ Category

April Unemployment Hits Lowest Point Since 2008

Posted by Admin On May - 16 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Falls to 7.9 Percent and Largest Decline Since 1976

CHICAGO, IL – The Illinois unemployment rate hit a new five-year low in April when it fell to 7.9 percent, according to data released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Illinois Department of Employment Security. More people working pushed the rate down 0.5 points, the lowest since December 2008 and largest monthly decline in the history of this data series which began in 1976.

“More people working is another sign that our economy is on the rebound,” IDES Director Jay Rowell said. “As Illinois’ economy continues to gain momentum, April’s numbers reflect more people getting back to work and more employers adapting to the new national economy.”

In April 2014, the number of unemployed individuals fell -35,700 (-6.5 percent) to 516,000. Total unemployed has fallen -237,500 (-31.5 percent) since January 2010 when the rate peaked at 11.4 percent. The unemployment rate fell even though preliminary estimates indicate 7,800 fewer private sector jobs in April and 29,300 more jobs than one year ago. The unemployment rate and job creation numbers can move independently of each other because they come from different surveys.

The unemployment rate is in line with other economic touch points. First-time jobless claims have been trending lower for the past four years and at 48,697 in April are 20 percent lower than one year ago. Numbers from the independent Conference Board’s Help Wanted OnLine Survey show Illinois employers in April advertised for more than 200,000 jobs (201,500 seasonally adjusted) and 85 percent sought full-time employment.

Illinois employers added +249,600 private sector jobs since the low point of employment in Illinois. Leading sectors are Professional and Business Services (+114,600, +14.6 percent); Education and Health Services (+55,900, +6.8 percent); and Leisure and Hospitality (+38,000, +7.4 percent). Government (-25,600, -3.0 percent) continues to lead job loss.

The unemployment rate identifies those who are out of work and seeking employment. A person who exhausts benefits, or is ineligible, still will be reflected in the unemployment rate if they actively seek work.

Historically, the national unemployment rate is lower than the state rate. The state rate has been lower than the national rate only six times since January 2000. This includes periods of economic expansion and contraction.

Notes:

· Illinois monthly labor force, unemployed and unemployment rates for years 2009-2013 have been revised as required by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. In February of each year, monthly labor force data for all states are revised to reflect updated sum-of-states controls, Census population controls, seasonal factors, non-farm jobs and unemployment insurance claims inputs. Data were also smoothed to eliminate large monthly changes as a result of volatility in the monthly household (CPS) survey. Comments and tables distributed in prior Illinois unemployment rate news release materials should be discarded because any analysis, including records, previously cited might no longer be valid.

· Seasonally adjusted employment data for subsectors within industries are not available.  For not seasonally adjusted jobs data with greater industry detail, go to http://www.ides.illinois.gov/LMI/CurrentEmploymentStatistics/I_SA_CES_Illinois_Jobs_2000_to_Current.xls “Other Services” includes a wide range of activities in three broad categories: Personal and laundry; repair and maintenance; and religious, grant making, civic and professional organizations.

· Monthly seasonally adjusted unemployment rates for Illinois and the Chicago-Naperville-Joliet Metropolitan Division are available at: http://www.ides.illinois.gov/LMI/Pages/Illinois_Chicago_Metropolitan_Area_Unemployment_Rates.aspx

IDES Website Becomes Mobile Friendly

Posted by Admin On May - 14 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Upgrades Help Workers Apply for Jobs

4.4 Million Unique Visitors in Past Year

CHICAGO, IL – People using mobile devices can better interact and communicate with the Illinois Department of Employment Security following website improvements launched this week, the Department said.

Automatically sizing to a user’s mobile device and the ability to sign-up for news alerts are key improvements that make the website’s tools more user-friendly. The enhancements will improve the user’s experience no matter their comfort level with the technology.

“These new website tools will help workers gather information, update resumes and apply for jobs,” IDES Director Jay Rowell said. “The latest news on career information, hiring events and no-cost HR services for employers is now available whether you are sitting comfortably at your computer, doing a quick search on your tablet or breezing through your smart phone.”

Workers can use the website to apply for unemployment insurance, certify for benefits and manage their account. They can apply for 150,000 jobs at Illinoisjoblink.com, the state’s help wanted hiring board operated by IDES. Employers can confirm a worker’s eligibility for unemployment insurance, research data to evaluate business opportunities and review 75,000 resumes.

The IDES website has evolved into a critical tool for employers and employees and has had more than 4.4 million unique visitors in the past year. Information is available in English, Spanish, Simplified Chinese and Russian. Interpreters are available for other languages.

State agencies are working together to deliver services to unemployed Illinois workers. Access to services for basic needs such as job training, food, clothing and shelter are located at www.ides.illinois.gov/assistance.

Unemployment Falls in Local Areas Across the State

Posted by Admin On March - 28 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Chicagoland Lowest Unemployment Since 2009


Not Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment Rates

Metropolitan Area

Feb.
2014*

Feb.
2013

Bloomington-Normal

8.0%

7.7%

Champaign-Urbana

8.7%

8.8%

Chicago-Joliet-Naperville

9.0%

9.8%

Danville

12.8%

11.9%

Davenport-Moline-Rock Isl.

7.9%

7.9%

Decatur

12.7%

12.8%

Kankakee-Bradley

12.1%

12.8%

Lake-Kenosha, IL-WI

9.5%

10.1%

Peoria

10.1%

10.0%

Rockford

12.1%

12.9%

Springfield

8.6%

8.9%

St. Louis (IL-Section)

9.2%

9.5%

* Data subject to revision.

CHICAGO – Local unemployment rates fell across the state in February and the rate in the Chicago-Joliet-Naperville Metro Division fell 0.8 percentage points to reach 9.0 percent, the lowest it has been since 2009, according to preliminary data released today by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and the Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES). Not seasonally adjusted data compares February 2014 to February 2013.

Illinois businesses added jobs in four metros. Largest increases: Lake-Kenosha (+2.7 percent, +10,300), Champaign-Urbana (+1.6 percent, +1,700), and Chicago-Joliet-Naperville (+0.8 percent, +28,000). Largest decreases: Bloomington-Normal (-2.1 percent, -1,900), Danville (-2.1 percent, -600) and Peoria (-1.8 percent, -3,300). Much of these decreases continue to reflect a temporary slowdown in global manufacturing demand. Industry sectors recording job growth in the most metros: Leisure and Hospitality (nine of 12), Wholesale Trade (seven of 12).

Not seasonally adjusted data compares the current month to the same month of the previous year. The February 2014 not seasonally adjusted Illinois rate was 9.4 percent and 12.2 percent at its peak in this economic cycle in January 2010. Nationally, the unemployment rate was 7.0 percent in February and 10.6 percent in January 2010 at its peak. The unemployment rate identifies those who are out of work and looking for work and is not tied to collecting unemployment insurance benefits. Historically, the state unemployment rate is higher than the national rate.

Total Non-farm Jobs (Not Seasonally Adjusted) – February 2014

Metropolitan Area

February
2014*

February
2013**

Over-the-Year Change

Bloomington-Normal MSA

88,400

90,300

-1,900

Champaign-Urbana MSA

107,000

105,300

1,700

Chicago-Joliet-Naperville Metro Div.

3,712,300

3,684,300

28,000

Danville MSA

28,200

28,800

-600

Davenport-Moline-Rock Island MSA

178,700

180,400

-1,700

Decatur MSA

50,300

50,900

-600

Kankakee-Bradley MSA

42,800

42,800

0

Lake County-Kenosha County Metro Div.

390,300

380,000

10,300

Peoria MSA

175,400

178,700

-3,300

Rockford MSA

144,600

145,200

-600

Springfield MSA

108,900

108,800

100

Illinois Section of St. Louis MSA

227,100

228,000

-900

*Preliminary **Revised

Illinois Employers Add 6,400 Jobs and Rate Holds at 8.7 Percent

Posted by Admin On March - 21 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Unemployment Data Best Since 2009


CHICAGO, IL – Illinois employers added +6,400 jobs in February and the unemployment rate remained unchanged at 8.7 percent and down from 9.2 percent one year ago, according to preliminary data released today by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Illinois Department of Employment Security.

The 8.7 percent unemployment rate in January and February is the lowest since February 2009 when it was 8.5 percent.

“February’s job numbers shows that our economy continues to improve. The snapshot is another positive piece in the long-term trend of economic growth building in Illinois,” IDES Director Jay Rowell said. “It also reminds us that more is needed and expected because that economic success has yet to return to every household.”

January’s preliminary job loss data already has been revised upward by the BLS. The new estimate, which could be further revised, emphasizes the volatility of monthly data. That is why public and private analysts prefer long-term trends when evaluating the strength of an economy.

Illinois added +257,400 private sector jobs since January 2010 when job growth returned following nearly two years of consecutive monthly declines. Leading sectors are Professional and Business Services (+121,000, +15.4 percent); Education and Health Services (+55,500, +6.7 percent); and Leisure and Hospitality (+36,800, +7.2 percent). Government (-25,600, -3 percent) continues to lead job loss.

In February, large gains in Professional and Business Services (+10,400) and Leisure and Hospitality (+4,000) more than offset declines in Trade, Transportation and Utilities (-6,100). Most of this decline was at Chicagoland food stores. In February 2014, the number of unemployed individuals increased 1,900 (+0.3 percent) to 569,100. Total unemployed has fallen -184,400 (-24.5 percent) since early 2010 when the state unemployment rate peaked at 11.4 percent in January.

Since January 2010, when compared to the previous month, Illinois recorded job growth in 35 months and job loss in 14. The unemployment rate fell in 24 months, increased in nine and was unchanged in 16.

The unemployment rate identifies those who are out of work and seeking employment. A person who exhausts benefits, or is ineligible, still will be reflected in the unemployment rate if they actively seek work. Historically, the national unemployment rate is lower than the state rate. The state rate has been lower than the national rate only six times since January 2000. This includes periods of economic expansion and contraction.

Notes:

Illinois monthly labor force, unemployed and unemployment rates for years 2009-2013 have been revised as required by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. In February of each year, monthly labor force data for all states are revised to reflect updated sum-of-states controls, Census population controls, seasonal factors, non-farm jobs and unemployment insurance claims inputs. Data were also smoothed to eliminate large monthly changes as a result of volatility in the monthly household (CPS) survey. Comments and tables distributed in prior Illinois unemployment rate news release materials should be discarded because any analysis, including records, previously cited might no longer be valid.

Seasonally adjusted employment data for subsectors within industries are not available. For not seasonally adjusted jobs data with greater industry detail, go to http://www.ides.illinois.gov/Custom/Library/Statistic/CES/I_NSA_CES_Illinois_MSAs_Jobs_2000_to_Current.XLS .

“Other Services” includes a wide range of activities in three broad categories: Personal and laundry; repair and maintenance; and religious, grant making, civic and professional organizations.

Monthly seasonally adjusted unemployment rates for Illinois and the Chicago-Naperville-Joliet Metropolitan Division are available at: http://www.ides.illinois.gov/page.aspx?item=2509 .

IDVA, IDES and U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation Partner to Put Veterans to Work

Posted by Admin On March - 19 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Pre-Register for March 26 Veteran Hiring Event to Maximize Job Opportunities

More than 150 On-the-Spot Job Offers Last Year


CHICAGO, IL – The Hiring Our Heroes – Chicago event, one of the largest efforts to help Veterans and their family members find employment, returns to Chicago on Wednesday, March 26. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs (IDVA) and Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES) are primary hosts. The event is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the University of Illinois Chicago Forum at 725 W. Roosevelt Road, Chicago.

More than 100 Chicago-area businesses are hiring to fill immediate job openings. To be considered, Veterans and military spouses should pre-register for this event at hiringhourheroes.org. This allows employers to review resumes, work experience and job skills prior to the event. Last year, this approach led employers to conduct 577 on-site interviews and make 152 job offers after outreach efforts by IDES, IDVA and other agencies.

Job seekers also are encouraged to take advantage of a free employment workshop at 8:30 a.m. focusing on resume writing, job search techniques and interview skills. There also will be an Employer Lunch & Learn for attending recruiters who wish to enhance their military hiring initiatives.

Veterans also should register with Illinoisjoblink.com, the state’s hiring board operated by IDES. It uses the same matching philosophy as the Hiring Our Heroes events. Further, employers can meet federal and state hiring requirements by using Illinoisjoblink.com. Job seekers can build multiple resumes to emphasize different skills and experiences. Business owners can use keyword matching technology to search resumes and find the best candidate. Illinoisjoblink.com is free and compares favorably to private efforts that cost hundreds of dollars. No-cost HR recruitment services for employers and workers are available at the website and at (877) 342-7533.

IDVA and IDES also support the Illinois Hires Heroes Consortium (IHHC), a group of Illinois employers who recognize the great value Veterans bring to the workplace and who are “Veteran-friendly” by committing to implement a series of military Veteran recruitment, training, and retention practices.

Veterans are sought-after employees for their service training, soft skills and experiences which include respect for authority, embracing responsibility and success in a team-based environment. Service members also have advanced training in fields ranging from technology and manufacturing to construction and logistics.

A state income tax credit of up to $5,000 is available to businesses for each qualified Veteran who is hired. Employers also might qualify for a federal tax credit of up to $9,600 through the Work Opportunity Tax Credit.

Other sponsors include the U.S. Department of Labor, the American Legion, Student Veterans of America, and the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce.

210,700 OnLine Jobs Openings in February

Posted by Admin On March - 11 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Median Earnings Between $10 and $48 an Hour

Local Data Shows Growth


CHICAGO, IL – Illinois Employers in February advertised online for more than 210,700 individual job openings, according to the independent Conference Board and the Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES). Eighty-five percent of the advertisements were for full-time work.

The advertising reflects help-wanted activity for newly created and replacement positions. The actual number of openings exceeds 210,700 because some industries, such as construction, typically do not advertise online.

“These help-wanted ads represent real opportunities for Illinois workers and show that Illinois’ economy is growing,” IDES Director Jay Rowell said. “The dignity of work is available to those who are prepared to succeed and who show employers why their skills and work ethic will help a company grow.”

Statewide, the five top advertised positions in February were truck drivers (9,063), registered nurses, (4,732), retail salespersons (4,186), first-line supervisors of retail sales workers (4,078) and marketing managers (3,704). The median hourly wage for an Illinois truck driver is $20.57; registered nurse, $31.34; retail salesperson, $9.85; first-line supervisors of retail salesperson, $17.03; and marketing managers, $48.78. Typically, the positions include some benefits, such as health insurance, paid sick days and vacation.

Included in the data are more than 130,000 positions advertised on Illinoisjoblink.com. IDES operates the state’s hiring board. Job seekers can build multiple resumes to emphasize different skills and experiences. Business owners can use keyword matching technology to search resumes and find the best candidate. Illinoisjoblink.com is free for workers and employers. It compares favorably to private efforts that cost hundreds of dollars. No-cost HR recruitment services for employers and workers are available at the website and at (877) 342-7533.

Using Illinoisjoblink.com to apply for jobs or record other work search efforts can ensure on-going eligibility for current and future unemployment insurance benefits.

The Conference Board collects the Help Wanted Online data. The Conference Board is a global, independent business membership and research association. The data measures new, first-time online jobs and jobs reposted from the previous month on internet job boards, corporate boards and smaller, niche websites.

HWOL Data for Economic Development Regions – February 2014

Top 5 Occupations:

Top 5 Occupations:

Region 1 – Central

Cass, Christian, Greene,

Logan, Macon, Macoupin,

Menard, Montgomery,

Morgan, Sangamon, Scott,

Shelby Counties

· Sales and Related Occupations: 1,014 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 972 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 749 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 667 jobs

· Management Occupations: 410 jobs

Region 2 – East

Central

Champaign, Douglas,

Ford, Iroquois, Piatt,

Vermilion Counties.

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 732 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 711 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 617 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 510 jobs

· Management Occupations: 401 jobs

Region 3 – North

Central

De Witt, Fulton, Livingston,

Mc Lean, Marshall, Mason,

Peoria, Stark, Tazewell,

Woodford Counties.

· Sales and Related Occupations: 1,324 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 1,031 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 891 jobs

· Computer and Mathematical Occupations: 799 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 710 jobs

Region 4 –

Northeast

Cook, De Kalb, Du Page,

Grundy, Kane, Kankakee,

Kendall, Lake, Mc Henry,

Will Counties.

· Computer and Mathematical Occupations: 21,145 jobs

· Management Occupations: 19,239 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 17,893 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 15,227 jobs

· Business and Financial Operations Occupations: 13,433 jobs

Region 5 – Northern

Stateline

Boone, Ogle, Stephenson,

Winnebago Counties.

· Sales and Related Occupations: 847 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 815 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 762 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 516 jobs

· Architecture and Engineering Occupations: 384 jobs

Region 6 –

Northwest

Bureau, Carroll, Henry, Jo

Daviess, La Salle, Lee,

Mercer, Putnam, Rock

Island, Whiteside Counties.

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 679 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 590 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 546 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 495 jobs

· Computer and Mathematical Occupations: 416 jobs

Region 7 –

Southeastern

Clark, Clay, Coles,

Crawford, Cumberland,

Edgar, Effingham, Fayette,

Jasper, Lawrence, Marion,

Moultrie, Richland

Counties.

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 293 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 268 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 225 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 204 jobs

· Production Occupations: 146 jobs

Region 8 –

Southern

Alexander, Edwards,

Franklin, Gallatin,

Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson,

Jefferson, Johnson,

Massac, Perry, Pope,

Pulaski, Saline, Union,

Wabash, Wayne, White,

Williamson Counties.

· Sales and Related Occupations: 466 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 427 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 324 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 315 jobs

· Management Occupations: 197 jobs

Region 9 –

Southwestern

Bond, Calhoun, Clinton,

Jersey, Madison, Monroe,

Randolph, St. Clair,

Washington Counties.

· Sales and Related Occupations: 646 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 526 jobs

· Computer and Mathematical Occupations: 483 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 462 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 460 jobs

Region 10 – West

Central

Adams, Brown, Hancock,

Henderson, Knox, Mc

Donough, Pike, Schuyler,

Warren Counties.

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 370 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 241 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 168 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 159 jobs

· Management Occupations: 134 jobs

208,400 Job Openings Online in January

Posted by Admin On February - 19 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

Median earnings between $10 and $48 an hour

Local Data Available Below

CHICAGO, IL – Employers in January advertised online for more than 208,400 individual job openings, according to the Conference Board and the Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES). Eight-five percent of the advertisements were for full-time work.

The advertising reflects help-wanted activity for newly created and replacement positions. The actual number of openings exceeds 208,400 because some industries, such as construction, do not typically advertise online.

“This independent report shows well paying career opportunities are abundant in our state,” IDES Director Jay Rowell said. “We know that educational attainment is the best predictor of employability. The most-often advertised jobs in January represent careers attainable through job training and college degrees.”

Statewide, the five top advertised positions in January were truck drivers (7,014), registered nurses, (5,869), retail salespersons (4,644), marketing managers (4,181) and first-line supervisors of retail sales workers (4,145). The median hourly wage for a truck driver is $20.57; registered nurse, $31.34; retail salesperson, $9.85; marketing managers, $48.78; and first-line supervisors of retail salesperson, $17.03. Typically, the positions include some benefits, such as health insurance, vacation and sick days.

Included in the data are more than 130,000 positions advertised on Illinoisjoblink.com. IDES operates the state’s hiring board. Job seekers can build multiple resumes to emphasize different skills and experiences. Business owners can use keyword matching technology to search resumes and find the best candidate. Illinoisjoblink.com is free for workers and employers. It compares favorably to private efforts that cost hundreds of dollars. No-cost HR recruitment services are available at the website and at (877) 342-7533.

Using Illinoisjoblink.com to apply for jobs or record other work search efforts can ensure on-going eligibility for current and future unemployment insurance benefits.

The Conference Board collects the Help Wanted Online data. The Conference Board is a global, independent business membership and research association. The data measures new, first-time online jobs and jobs reposted from the previous month on internet job boards, corporate boards and smaller, niche websites.


HWOL Data for Economic Development Regions – January 2014

Top 5 Occupations:

Top 5 Occupations:

Region 1 – Central

Cass, Christian, Greene,

Logan, Macon, Macoupin,

Menard, Montgomery,

Morgan, Sangamon, Scott,

Shelby Counties

· Sales and Related Occupations: 1,016 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 847 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 741 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 579 jobs

· Management Occupations: 456 jobs

Region 2 – East

Central

Champaign, Douglas,

Ford, Iroquois, Piatt,

Vermilion Counties.

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 819 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 696 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 557 jobs

· Management Occupations: 458 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 455 jobs

Region 3 – North

Central

De Witt, Fulton, Livingston,

Mc Lean, Marshall, Mason,

Peoria, Stark, Tazewell,

Woodford Counties.

· Sales and Related Occupations: 1,312 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 922 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 853 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 780 jobs

· Computer and Mathematical Occupations: 591 jobs

Region 4 –

Northeast

Cook, De Kalb, Du Page,

Grundy, Kane, Kankakee,

Kendall, Lake, Mc Henry,

Will Counties.

· Management Occupations: 19,966 jobs

· Computer and Mathematical Occupations: 19,550 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 17,689 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 13,543 jobs

· Business and Financial Operations Occupations: 13,356 jobs

Region 5 – Northern

Stateline

Boone, Ogle, Stephenson,

Winnebago Counties.

· Sales and Related Occupations: 823 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 662 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 655 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 579 jobs

· Management Occupations: 381 jobs

Region 6 –

Northwest

Bureau, Carroll, Henry, Jo

Daviess, La Salle, Lee,

Mercer, Putnam, Rock

Island, Whiteside Counties.

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 677 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 509 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 436 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 374 jobs

· Computer and Mathematical Occupations: 349 jobs

Region 7 –

Southeastern

Clark, Clay, Coles,

Crawford, Cumberland,

Edgar, Effingham, Fayette,

Jasper, Lawrence, Marion,

Moultrie, Richland

Counties.

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 300 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 227 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupation: 221 jobs

· Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations: 205 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 159 jobs

Region 8 –

Southern

Alexander, Edwards,

Franklin, Gallatin,

Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson,

Jefferson, Johnson,

Massac, Perry, Pope,

Pulaski, Saline, Union,

Wabash, Wayne, White,

Williamson Counties.

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 494 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 434 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 263 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 262 jobs

· Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations: 253 jobs

Region 9 –

Southwestern

Bond, Calhoun, Clinton,

Jersey, Madison, Monroe,

Randolph, St. Clair,

Washington Counties.

· Sales and Related Occupations: 632 jobs

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 581 jobs

· Computer and Mathematical Occupations: 466 jobs

· Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations: 462 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 420 jobs

Region 10 – West

Central

Adams, Brown, Hancock,

Henderson, Knox, Mc

Donough, Pike, Schuyler,

Warren Counties.

· Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations: 419 jobs

· Sales and Related Occupations: 264 jobs

· Transportation and Material Moving Occupations: 176 jobs

· Office and Administrative Support Occupations: 151 jobs

· Management Occupations: 147 jobs

State highlights the benefits of older workers during Awareness Week from September 22nd to 28th

Posted by Admin On September - 26 - 2013 ADD COMMENTS

Observance highlights program that provides training to seniors

SPRINGFIELD, IL – Illinois Department on Aging (IDoA) Director John K. Holton, Ph.D., is encouraging employers to recognize the contributions of older adults in the workplace in observance of National Employ the Older Worker Week. Each year during the last full week of September, the observance sponsored by the U.S Department of Labor highlights how communities benefit from the contributions of older workers who have remained on the job. The theme for this year’s observance is that older workers are a valuable asset for employers, especially as it relates to mentoring and being a role model for younger workers.

“According to statistics from the U.S. Bureau of Labor, by next year, 41% of Americans age 55 and older will be employed, accounting for more than 21% of the work force. And since people are healthier and living longer, many will probably remain on the job longer than previous generations of workers. This can benefit employers because older workers have a wealth of knowledge, and can teach skills and mentor newer staff,” said Director Holton.

There are many reasons older adults choose to remain in the workforce. A 2013 survey by the National Council on Aging cites the most common reason is to stay active and productive. The second most common reason is respondents said they enjoyed their work, more than 60% said they needed the money, and more than half surveyed said that working gave them a sense of purpose and allowed them to stay connected to other people.

National Employ the Older Workers Week also marks the anniversary of the Older Americans Act of 1965, which led to more program services to benefit older adults. One such program is the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) to provide on-the-job skills training to individuals age 55 and older who have limited financial resources. SCSEP is federally funded through a grant from the U.S Department of Labor under Title V of the Older Americans Act. IDoA administers SCSEP through the Area Agencies on Aging and providers at the local level to provide assistance to low-income seniors who are looking to re-enter the workforce.

SCSEP participants are enrolled to work at community service or non-profit agencies usually for 20 hours a week at minimum wage. Through the program they receive personalized employment-related counseling and job-related training designed to assist them in finding permanent employment. Training may include improving existing skills, developing new skills, and educational opportunities.

Since its inception, SCSEP has helped more than one million older Americans re-enter the workforce. Last year in Illinois, 502 older adults participated in SCSEP and 50 participants were hired for permanent employment.

For more information about programs to assist older adults in Illinois and their caregivers, including the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP), call the Department on Aging Senior HelpLine at 1-800-252-8966, or for TTY (hearing impaired use only) call 1-888-206-1327.

IDES chosen for Veteran Employment Initiative

Posted by Admin On September - 18 - 2013 ADD COMMENTS

Army UCX to use social media to drive Vet job search

CHICAGO, IL – Federal officials looking to engage younger Veterans and quickly return them to civilian employment chose to pay for an innovative social media program by the Illinois Department of Employment Security. The pilot program could become a best-practices model to be used nationwide.

Dubbed Army UCX, the program emphasizes social media channels to connect Veterans with IDES employment services and the state’s help-wanted job board, Illinoisjoblink.com. Recently discharged Veterans qualify for unemployment insurance and the federally designated UCX acronym indicates Unemployment Compensation Ex-Military.

“Illinois has a good story to tell regarding Veterans and work. The Veteran unemployment rate in Illinois is below the civilian rate and lower than the national rate,” IDES Director Jay Rowell said. “However, the unemployment rate among young Gulf War II Veterans is unacceptably high across our nation. That is why we must find new ways to convey to Veterans that it is OK to ask for help. Army UCX guides Veterans to our door so we can personalize a service plan that meets the needs of that specific Veteran and their family.”

IDES is charged with delivering re-employment services to Veterans and helped 17,000 Veterans find meaningful employment last year. The Veteran unemployment rate in Illinois is lower than the national rate. In 2012, the state rate was 6.8 percent and the national rate was 7.0 percent. Nationwide, however, the unemployment rate for Gulf War II Veterans between the ages of 18 and 24 is significantly higher at 20.4 percent. A comparable state rate is not available.

“Illinois’ selection for this pilot program is encouraging – as well as indicative of the innovative support that Governor Quinn’s administration has consistently provided to our Veterans,” said Erica Borggren, Director of the Illinois Department of Veterans’ Affairs. “IDES’ work to target its outreach and employment toward newly returning Veterans is tremendously important and can make a real difference to Veterans struggling to transition to civilian employment.”

There are anecdotal reasons why young Gulf II Veterans have greater difficulty obtaining civilian employment. Chief among them is the lack of civilian work and work-search support structure before enlisting. Not having a successful experience looking for work prior to their military service creates barriers not found in other job candidates. The inability to translate military experience to a civilian position widens the employment gap. Finally, once a Veteran returns to the United States, the more time taken before launching a civilian work search, the lesser the likelihood that employment will be obtained.

Illinois’ $700,000, two-year program will test the emerging theory that using social media to more quickly and frequently engage Veterans will lead to shorter readjustment times and fewer weeks collecting unemployment insurance. Central to this theory is that these young Veterans do not readily embrace the fraternal organizations of prior military generations, such as the posts affiliated with the American Legion or Veterans of Foreign Wars. The inherent support system natural to such organizations also provided a proven employment network. While young Veterans are not inclined to use fraternal services, they are likely to engage in social media platforms because they did so prior to deployment.

Veterans can access personalized UCX service through Illinoisjoblink.com. The state’s hiring board features more than 120,000 help-wanted ads. Job seekers can build multiple resumes to emphasize different skills and experiences. Business owners can use keyword matching technology to search resumes and find the best candidate. Illinoisjoblink.com is free at the website and at (877) 342-7533.

Illinois was chosen because it was among the first states to propose a comprehensive outreach strategy built around social media. Although social media channels have been key components of private-sector campaigns, the tool remains relatively new to the military’s hierarchal structure that benefits greatly from tradition and personal communication and whose leaders were not exposed to the technology when they entered the service. Army UCX is in line with other Illinois and IDES efforts, including:

The Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) in 2012 named IDES the first workforce agency in the country to sign a statement of support reaffirming the critical role that Guard and Reserve soldiers serve in securing our nation’s freedom. The ESGR is part of our nation’s Department of Defense.

The American Legion named Illinois’ Bloomington office as the best provider of employment services to Veterans in 2012. The award was presented in August 2013 at the American Legion’s 95th national convention in Houston, Texas. IDES was the only agency nationwide to receive this honor.

The Hiring Veterans Tax Credit provides a business up to a $5,000 tax credit for each unemployed Veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan. It also honors Gold Star families by making them eligible for the same property tax relief available in some communities to the families of fallen firefighters and police officers.

Veteran Hiring Events use illinoisjoblink.com to pre-screen attendees. The process enabled employers to hire 150 Veterans during an event earlier this year.

Out of a job? Don’t bet your life savings on a scam warns Better Business Bureau

Posted by Admin On September - 11 - 2013 ADD COMMENTS

CHICAGO, IL – If you don’t have a job, it is easy to be enticed by postings offering new business deals that claim you can be your own boss and make over $100,000 a year. Before even considering a new business opportunity, the Better Business Bureau (BBB) warns that it is critical that you read all documents closely before signing to make sure the new business deal isn’t a scam.

“It is easy to immediately want to sign something that promises you a lot of fast money, especially in today’s economy,” said Steve J. Bernas, president & CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “However, when sellers promise consumers a significant amount of money, it is often a scam.”

According to the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Business Opportunity Law, salespeople asking you to sign on the dotted line or send money for a business opportunity must provide a disclosure statement and an earnings claims statement.

The BBB urges people to carefully read the disclosure document because it must identify the seller, mention the new business refund or cancellation policy, say whether the seller is making an earnings claim, mention lawsuits against the seller and must provide a list of references. The earnings claim statement must tell how much money a person could earn. The statement must include name of person making the claim, the specifics of the claim, start and end dates earnings were achieved and the numbers and percentages of people who got the results the seller claimed are true.

Thomas Cicerchia of Mount Prospect was recently a victim of a new business opportunity scam from Zaken Corporation. “They sent me a mailing about an opportunity and I was out of work and desperate to try something. I sent them my last $100,” said Cicerchia. “After reading the documents I called to cancel within the allowed time period and had trouble reaching them. Then they refused to refund the money because I had gone past the allowed time.”

The BBB offers the following tips:

  • Study all documents before signing or sending money. Take a careful look at the disclosure document, earnings claim and contract. Make sure each document is specific and is clearly laid out.

  • Interview current owners of the seller’s business opportunity. Ask these people all the tough questions you have. For example, ask if the disclosure document matches with their actual experience.

  • Require proof from the earnings claims’ statements. For statements such as “Earn up to $10,000,” it is your right to ask for proof.

  • Listen to sales presentations closely. Make sure you understand every aspect of the new business opportunity. Pay attention to what the seller is trying to sell to you.

  • Consider getting professional advice. In these kinds of situations, lawyers, accountants or business advisors are always willing to look over the paperwork before you sign.

  • Do internet searches for the seller. Check for any complaints or scams associated with the company by looking at websites such as Better Business Bureau and State Attorney General’s office. Remember, having zero complaints doesn’t necessarily make a company legitimate.

For more tips and information about scams, visit www.bbb.org

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Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

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