March , 2018

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OpEd: Here’s to This Flag of Mine

Posted by Admin On March - 5 - 2018

                                                          By Dr. Sunni Ali


Why should African Americans celebrate allegiance to the U.S. Flag?


Many people argue that the long history of slavery, Jim Crow, and racism alone entitles black people’s exemption away from pledging their allegiance to this nation’s flag.


From President Trump’s recent harsh statement toward National Football League players’ refusal to stand during the National Anthem to NFL owners and politicians’ perspectives over this issue, generations of black folk since the time of Frederick Douglass and the black emigrate movements of the1820s questioned their patriotism.


The powerful lesson of Colin Kaepernick is similar to that of a patriot, a person who sacrifices themselves fighting injustice and unfairness to birth change. Since its conception, America has needed patriots around to demand that equality and equity become common for all people living in this nation.


Kaprenick’s refusal to stand during the National Anthem served as notice to the nation it is not living up to its creed, which struck a chord for people choosing to ignore the current racial issues shaking up the American landscape such as, the unjustifiable police homicides of black civilians.


The history of having patriots, rebels, and intellectuals apply rhetoric, civil protest, and rebellion helped progress America. Yet as perplexed, challenged, and complicated American history has been toward African Americans, their loyalty and honor toward the American flag continues to celebrate an abundant country they helped make possible while arguing for more progressive change to improve a nation.


Hence the title of text, Here’s to This Flag of Mine springs forth from Marcus Garvey’s Black Nationalist Song, written by his wife, Amy Jacques Garvey, which provides a metanarrative of the African American experience dealing with the challenges paying homage to a nation’s flag.


Such arguments emerged through the 20th Century between W.E.B. Dubois and Marcus Garvey as well as Malcolm X and Dr. King Jr. Despite this, majority of African Americans continue to believe in the hopes, dreams, and values America promises.


The significance of African American’s patriotic debate is also rooted to W.E.B. Dubois’ Double Consciousness Theory that says African Americans harbor a divided soul living in America; they struggle with being African and American while paying homage to both.


Especially considering the magnificent contributions blacks have made to the nation before its conception. Indeed, African people have helped to develop the Americas as far back as 700 A.C.E.


Hence, the journey of African Americans goes beyond the pages of any history textbook or lesson that emphasize a narrative of chattel slavery. African Americans have been the scientists, mathematicians, architects, artisans, domestic engineers, horticulturalists, agrarian specialists, and soldiers for a nation that marginalized their existence. Thereby blacks’ loyalty or patriotism should never be questioned.


Here’s To A Flag of Mine celebrates the struggles, successes, and challenges imposed onto African Americans fighting to improve their second-class status. A history that deserves reparations and appreciation as America transitions beyond the 21st Century.


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Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

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