20
October , 2018
Saturday

Email This Post Email This Post
OpEd By ShaRhonda Knott-Dawson
ShaRhonda Knott-Dawson
To my beautiful, brilliant Black daughters:

I have so many hopes and dreams for you, that if I tried to say them all, they would run longer than the entire Harry Potter series!

My hopes for you, my two beautiful Black girls, are so simple and yet also entirely grandiose. My dreams for you, beautiful Black girls, are that you are free to be whoever you want to be.

If you only get one lesson from me, your mother, let it be this: Your history didn’t start with slavery, and White people’s history didn’t start in the United States of America.

As your Black parents, your father and I are teaching you our viewpoint. Our Black culture begins with the beginning of humans.

In fact, the first humans lived in Africa. The first civilizations were in Africa. Our Christianity began in Africa. Africa is our homeland and everything about Africa should bring you pride. Wear your African-ness, your Blackness with pride!

Your history, the history of the continent of civilization in Africa, starts in modern day Sudan, around 6000 B.C. In fact, the first “empire” of two great nations happened between modern-day Egypt and modern-day Sudan. We will be sure you know those modern names are European names. We will teach you their deep-rooted African names: KMT and Meroe.

We are teaching you the history of Ancient Kemet, Meroe and Nubia.

You will learn of the African civilizations, the use of iron and tools in Africa, the resource riches of the African continent and the complicated, fascinating history of over 10,000 years of human civilization. Africa had kings and queens and warriors, slaves, artists, scientists, mathematicians, farmers, sailors, inventors and musicians. You come from a beautifully talented Black culture.

As your mother, I have told you repeatedly that you are already free to be whoever you want to be. But as you approach adolescence and spend more time in schools than you do with your parents, you may begin to doubt that I told you the truth.

See, the books that you will read and the lessons you learn, will not validate your potential exactly as you are, beautiful, brilliant Black girls, from a legacy of beautiful, brilliant Black women.

YOU MUST LEARN THEIR HISTORY.  
BUT YOU CAN TAKE A BROADER PERSPECTIVE.

In formal school education, you will be exposed to a different viewpoint. Most school curricula in the United States are completely uninterested in young, brilliant Black girls like you learning about your culture, discovering multiple viewpoints or forming your own opinions.

In school, you will likely be inundated with stories of Europe: Ancient Greece, Roman Empire, the Medieval Period, Dark Ages, Industrial Revolution and the British Empire. Then you will be told all about the greatness of the United States of America that comes from the rich history of Europe.

You will be forced to memorize, learn and admire the brilliance and beauty of Europe and White people.

This is something I cannot protect you from. You must learn their history. But remember, more than facts are at stake. In those classrooms, you are seeing only their viewpoint. You can take a broader perspective.

OUR BLACKNESS IS BEAUTIFUL, BRILLIANT AND RESILIENT

The United States of America was founded in 1776. On July 4, 2018, the U.S. will be 243 years old. Europeans landed in the Americas in 1492 and have been interacting with indigenous land of the First Americans, for almost 550 years.

Understand this, my beautiful, brilliant Black daughters. Your history is over 10,000 years old. The enslavement of Black people by White people, is at best, only 550 years of your history.

That is a mere 5.5 percent of your totality. Sure, the enslavement of Black people by White people, and our subsequent struggles to become totally free, are important to know and learn. But they are a very, very small part of who you really are and who you, and we, as Black people, can be.

What makes you, and other beautiful, brilliant, Black children, different from many White children, is you know that their history isn’t just fact-it is a viewpoint. And, that you, as a Black American, as a Black African, have completely different interpretations of history, of heroes, of scholars and who is “important.”

As your parent, I wish you were free, my beautiful, brilliant Black children to speak openly, honestly and without fear about who you are and your Black history. But it is not always safe for you to do that.

Talking about Ancient Egypt being African can get you in trouble. Having a name that “sounds Black” can lose you a job. In fact, much of life will be devoted to protecting yourself from White people’s false views about who Black people are and what they have and can do.

But I promise you, with all that I am, I will tell you the truth. Just as my mother told me the truth. Your ancestors who came to the Americas 500 years ago not only survived attempted physical and cultural genocide, they kept our Black African story, culture and beauty alive.

Remember 550 years is nothing compared to over 10,000 years. Our last 550 years is not our whole story.

In fact, it is just a tiny piece of the story. No matter what White people think, or try to tell you about who you are as a Black person, we have a very different perspective.

As your parent, I swear on the lives of all our ancestors over our 10,000-year history, I will never let you forget how beautiful and brilliant you are, my Black daughters. Nor will I let you forget our beautiful, brilliant Black culture.

You are part of a beautiful, brilliant, Black people that has a history and presence throughout the world. 500 years? Ha! You are in but a minute of your 10,000-year story. Our Black is brilliant, beautiful and most importantly, resilient.

This piece originally appeared on EducationPost.org.

ShaRhonda Knott-Dawson is the mother of two free-spirited, strong-willed girls and has a husband who should be appointed a saint for co-existing in the madness that is their life. She writes on politics, education, current events and social justice.

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

Recent Posts