14
December , 2017
Thursday

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By Juanita Bratcher

Author, Editor & Publisher of CopyLine Magazine

The verdict returned by jurors in the George Zimmerman’s murder trial over the weekend was nothing more than an absolute “miscarriage of justice.” Justice was denied. There’s no question about it! I was surprised, disappointed and yes, outraged over the jurors’ decision knowing full-well that ‘justice did not prevail in this verdict.’ How can a 28-year-old grown man (Zimmerman) packing a Kel Tek .9 mm PF9 semi-automatic handgun wrapped around his waist murder a 17-year-old unarmed teenager (Trayvon Martin) on a whim and walk away free without any punishment at all? That’s beyond my reasonable ability to understand or comprehend.

Trayvon Martin was the unarmed black teenager walking outside a gated community in Sanford, Fla., on the way back to his father’s fiance’s house after buying skittles and iced tea at a convenience store.

It is questionable how a jury comprised of five white women and a Hispanic woman could come to this decision/conclusion – returning a not guilty verdict in the murder case of Zimmerman. One of the jurors (B37) who is said to have a book deal – and in the process of writing a book on the trial – in an exclusive interview with CNN’s Anderson Cooper, said she didn’t see it as a “racial thing but a murder case.” Pure baloney. Zimmerman’s actions from the beginning overwhelmingly point directly to racial profiling.

Juror B37 said there was “no doubt” that Zimmerman feared for his life. I’m sure Trayvon Martin also feared for his life when he saw Zimmerman following him. And even if Martin fought back that’s human nature; anyone who fears for their life is going to fight back and try to protect themselves from those they fear will attack or harm them. According to reports, Zimmerman never identified himself to Martin as being a neighborhood watch volunteer. And if Zimmerman was beaten so badly, why didn’t he seek medical treatment immediately? He didn’t seek medical treatment until the next day.

During the trial, one of Zimmerman’s attorneys brought in a block of cement saying Trayvon had a weapon – concrete – that Trayvon pounded Zimmerman’s head on the ground

If Zimmerman was so badly beaten by Trayvon on the concrete, why did he refuse medical treatment immediately rather than wait until the next day?

And do you scream when you’re the one armed with a gun over an unarmed teenager?

It was a tragedy, an unnecessary tragedy. Zimmerman created a problem that didn’t exist in the first place. Trayvon wasn’t doing anything suspicious that would cause Zimmerman to follow him…other than being black? However, Zimmerman, in a 911 call with a dispatcher,  said he saw a suspicious person (Trayvon), a black male, acting strange and might be on drugs. In the end, Zimmerman took a life, shooting Trayvon in the chest at close range.

What’s more, Zimmerman wasn’t and isn’t a police officer or anyone in law enforcement with arrest powers. When he called the police the 911 dispatcher told him not to follow Martin, but he disobeyed the order. In Zimmerman’s mind (his actions) he felt Trayvon needed to be followed because he was a black teenager up to no good.

However, the jurors (their verdict) and George Zimmerman (his aggressive and egregious actions toward Trayvon Martin) will have to live with this for the rest of their lives – if they have a conscience.

One of the things most noticeable to me was the smiles on Zimmerman’s Attorneys’ faces during a news conference after the verdict. Of course attorneys want to win their cases – I don’t take issue with that – but something as serious as a life having been taken at the hands of a murderer, the least they could do was to respect Trayvon Martin’s family and keep things serious and treat it as the serious matter it is. This was a serious matter, not one of winning a corporate contract over another corporate company.

But there’s a Higher Power that’s more powerful than any man here on earth regardless of how famous, how rich or influential, or the positions that they hold. That Higher Power is God, not man.

In a pre-trial interview with Fox News Sean Hannity in 2012,  Zimmerman said killing Trayvon was part of God’s plan. His exact words were: “No sir. I feel that it was all God’s plan and not for me to second-guess it or judge it.” Oh, my Lord! The God that I serve plans would never be one of violence…of killing…of murder…of anything negative.

Blacks must use their energy and strategic planning to counteract unfair atrocities such as these. They must also fight for those things that are taken away judicially such as the recent decision by the U.S. Supreme Court stripping Section Four from the Voting Rights Act, a crucial part of the Act. It was obvious that during the 2012 election certain legislatures around the country tried to suppress voting by minorities and others through Voter ID laws, and by shortening days and hours for people to vote.

The struggle continues.

Juanita Bratcher is an Award-Winning Journalist, the Publisher of www.copylinemagazine.com and the author of several books, songwriter and poet. She has been a Journalist for more than 37 years covering politics, education and a wide-range of other topics.

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Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

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