25
November , 2017
Saturday

Email This Post Email This Post

Schools implementing Common Core Standards and moving toward multiple measures to gauge progress

 

SPRINGFIELD, IL – The Illinois State Board of Education today reviewed statewide 2012 assessment data that show 713 or 82 percent of Illinois districts, and 2,545 or 66 percent of schools, failed to make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) under No Child Left Behind. The number of schools not making AYP grew over last year but only slightly as AYP benchmarks were frozen, allowing Illinois schools to meet last year’s performance expectations while the state – like much of the country – moves closer to a new accountability system that emphasizes student growth rather than performance at one point in time.

“We are truly in a transition period in education as we move away from the punitive and one-size-fits-all nature of No Child Left Behind and into a system that will provide more comprehensive and useful information for parents, educators and students themselves about each child’s progress over time,” said State Superintendent of Education Christopher A. Koch. “We are hopeful that this is the last year we report on AYP results and can instead offer data that paints a fuller picture of each student’s and school’s learning experience.”

As evidence of the disconnect under NCLB, Superintendent Koch pointed out that only 11 high schools made AYP in 2012, though many more rank among the best high schools in the country. Schools can miss making AYP because of the performance of a sub-group, even when the school overall meets benchmarks and/or makes progress over last year.

The results were announced as part of the State Board’s statewide analysis of the 2012 State Report Card during their monthly meeting on Tuesday at Southland Charter School in Richton Park.

The statewide composite score for students meeting and exceeding standards on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) given to elementary students stayed nearly flat, going from 82.0 in 2011 to 82.1 in 2012.

The composite score for the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE), given to 11th graders, increased from 50.5 in 2011 to 51.3 in 2012. New State rules, passed in 2011, better defined 11th graders who have been required since 2001 to take the PSAE, which includes the ACT. Those rules have led to an increase of more than 12,000 PSAE test takers in 2011 and 2012.

Students in third through eighth grades last March took the ISAT in reading and mathematics while fourth and seventh graders were also tested in science. Students in 11th grade last April took the PSAE, which tests students in math, reading and science. Only reading and mathematics results are used in calculating AYP.

Illinois’ NCLB waiver remains under review with the U.S. Department of Education. The federal education agency has indicated that the only barrier to approval of the Illinois waiver application remains the state’s disagreement regarding the timeline for when districts must use student growth in their new local teacher evaluation system. The U.S. Department of Education is calling for all districts to implement new evaluations in 2014-15, but Illinois law calls for a progressive phase in, with some districts beginning to use the new evaluation system as early as this year and all districts using it by 2016-17.

Superintendent Koch emphasized that the Board remains optimistic that the state will resolve this issue in time for next year. In the interim, the State Board requested and received a freeze to the Annual Measurable Objectives at the 2010-11 school year levels. The AMO freeze means the calculations for Adequate Yearly Progress targets for 2011-12 are based on the previous year’s levels, without increasing. Therefore, schools were expected to show 85 percent of students meeting or exceeding standards in 2012, same as last year. Attendance rate targets for elementary and middle schools in 2012 remained the same as the previous year at 91 percent. Targets for graduation rates also remained the same at 82 percent.

“I’ve spoken with Secretary Duncan and I’m confident that our waiver application, which really represents Illinois’ roadmap for preparing students for success in college and careers, will be accepted next year and we’ll be able to fully move forward with our reform agenda,” said State Board of Education Chairman Gery J. Chico. “In the meantime, we are already implementing many elements of our plan to better gauge each student’s and school’s performance.”

 Reform Agenda

Some of the reforms that will be implemented in the 2012-13 school year include:

 

  • Continued implementation of the more rigorous Common Core Standards in English Language Arts and Math.

 

  • ISBE will recommend schools administer the ACT-aligned exam “EXPLORE” to 9th graders in public schools and the corresponding exam “PLAN” to 10th graders as part of a testing system that includes the ACT, already part of the Illinois Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE) in the 11th grade. EXPLORE and PLAN, produced by ACT, test students on English, Math, Reading and Science.

 

  • Beginning in the spring of 2013, grade 11 students will take a third WorkKeys assessment that can help students earn a Career Readiness Certificate confirming employability skills.

 

  • Illinois will raise performance levels for the 2013 administration of the ISAT to better gauge college and career-readiness and to better align with the PSAE. 
  • A growth model based on value tables will be developed to measure progress for grades 3 through 11.

 

  • A survey of learning conditions will be administered to all K-12 teachers and 6-12 students in Spring 2013 with results reported on next year’s report card.

 

  • The Center for School Improvement will provide coordination and coherence to school improvement services, specifically those targeting the lowest performing schools and those with the largest achievement gaps.

 

“As we take on some of these reforms, we know there will be growing pains,” said State Superintendent Koch. “We expect ISAT scores will drop next year under the new performance levels. But, we owe it to our students to better align the ISAT with the rigor and college and career readiness benchmarks of the PSAE. Now, 82 percent of students in the state meet or exceed on the ISAT, compared to 51 percent on the PSAE. We must raise our expectations at the elementary level so that students are on track to leave high school prepared to succeed in the workforce, career and daily life.”

Illinois is a member of the 23-state Partnership for Assessment for College and Careers (PARCC) that is developing a new generation of tests aligned to the new standards to better measure students’ knowledge, skills and growth. The new state tests are expected to be available by the 2014-15 school year. 

New Report Card

 

Under legislation passed last year, ISBE, in collaboration with many education partners across the state, is developing a new `at-a-glance’ report card designed to be more readable and user-friendly. Set to debut in Fall 2013, Race to the Top funds are supporting the redesign that will feature  more academic information as well as feedback about learning conditions from a new survey of teachers and students. 

 

Illinois 5Essentials Survey 

Between Feb. 1 and the end of March 2013, the survey of learning conditions will be administered to all K-12 teachers and students in grades 6 through 12  in public schools. The survey, developed by the University of Chicago, is based on more than 20 years of research and aims to help identify strengths and weaknesses in five essential areas: instruction, environment, leaders, teachers and family involvement.

To be called “Illinois 5Essentials Survey,” a version of this survey has been used for more than a decade in Chicago Public Schools and more recently in other districts across the nation. The University of Chicago has found that schools strong on three or more of the five essentials are 10 times more likely to make substantial gains in math and reading. Districts can also give the survey to parents on a voluntary basis.

Student Demographics & Performance    

 

·         The number of districts declined from 891 in 2003 to 866 in 2012; there were 378 elementary districts, 100 high school districts, and 388 unit districts.

·         In 2011-12, the total enrollment in Illinois public schools was 2,066,692, down more than 8,000 (8,114) students from 2011.

·         Since 1999, the percentage of low-income students has increased from 36.1 percent to 49 percent in 2012.

·         Minority enrollment increased from 38 percent in 1999 to 49 percent. The increase is attributed to the growth of the Hispanic student population, which increased from 13.9 percent in 1999 to 23.6 percent of all students in 2012.

·         The number of Limited-English proficient (LEP) students increased from 6.3 percent in 2003 to 9.4 percent in 2012. LEP students include those who are eligible for bilingual education.

·         The composite score for all state tests increased slightly from 76.4 in 2010 to 76.7 in 2012.

·         Eighty-two percent of districts failed to make AYP in 2012, an increase from 64 percent in 2010. 

ISBE has produced the School Report Card since 1986 for every public school and district in Illinois. State report cards have been produced since 2002 and are required under No Child Left Behind. 

ISAT Statewide Averages in Reading/Percentage Meet and Exceeds

Grade

Year

Percentage Meet and Exceeds

3

2008

71.7

2009

72.2

2010

73.7

2011

74.7

2012

76.1

4

2008

73.2

2009

73.8

2010

73.7

2011

74.7

2012

76.0

5

2008

73.5

2009

73.5

2010

74.7

2011

76.4

2012

77.8

6

2008

79.0

2009

79.9

2010

81.2

2011

84.1

2012

81.7

7

2008

77.7

2009

77.5

2010

77.5

2011

78.8

2012

78.1

8

2008

81.4

2009

83.6

2010

84.1

2011

85.0

2012

86.2

 

ISAT Statewide Averages in Math/Percentage Meet and Exceeds

Grade

Year

Percentage Meet and Exceeds

3

2008

85.1

2009

85.2

2010

86.3

2011

87.3

2012

87.7

4

2008

84.6

2009

85.7

2010

86.0

2011

87.7

2012

88.1

5

2008

81.4

2009

82.4

2010

83.4

2011

84.0

2012

83.6

6

2008

82.6

2009

82.4

2010

84.6

2011

84.0

2012

85.0

7

2008

80.4

2009

82.8

2010

84.4

2011

84.3

2012

84.6

8

2008

80.4

2009

81.7

2010

83.7

2011

86.3

2012

85.0

 

ISAT Statewide Averages Science/Percentage Meet and Exceeds

Grade

Year

Percentage Meet and Exceeds

4

2008

76.2

2009

76.8

2010

76.7

2011

79.3

2012

79.8

7

2008

79.1

2009

79.5

2010

82.4

2011

81.9

2012

79.9

 

PSAE Statewide Averages/Percentage Meet and Exceeds

Year

Reading

Math

Science

2008

53.3

53.0

51.2

2009

56.9

51.6

50.5

2010

54.0

52.7

52.4

2011

51.0

51.3

49.2

2012

50.7

51.6

51.7

           
You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

Welcome to CopyLine Magazine! The first issue of CopyLine Magazine was published in November, 1990, by Editor & Publisher Juanita Bratcher. CopyLine’s main focus is on the political arena – to inform our readers and analyze many of the pressing issues of the day - controversial or otherwise. Our objectives are clear – to keep you abreast of political happenings and maneuvering in the political arena, by reporting and providing provocative commentaries on various issues. For more about CopyLine Magazine, CopyLine Blog, and CopyLine Television/Video, please visit juanitabratcher.com, copylinemagazine.com, and oneononetelevision.com. Bratcher has been a News/Reporter, Author, Publisher, and Journalist for 33 years. She is the author of six books, including “Harold: The Making of a Big City Mayor” (Harold Washington), Chicago’s first African-American mayor; and “Beyond the Boardroom: Empowering a New Generation of Leaders,” about John Herman Stroger, Jr., the first African-American elected President of the Cook County Board. Bratcher is also a Poet/Songwriter, with 17 records – produced by HillTop Records of Hollywood, California. Juanita Bratcher Publisher

Recent Posts